Jubilee Clock

Location: Douglas, Isle of Man

Situated at Victoria St and Loch Promenade this clock tower drinking fountain was donated by GW Dumbell in 1887 as a commemoration of the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria’s reign.

The front of the octagonal pedestal originally offered a large drinking trough for horses supported by legs in the form of hooves and fetlocks. Receptacles for human consumption were supplied in the form of small basins with a trefoil art-form located between the basin and the tap above.

Bands of quatrefoil fret are in each of the eight panels surrounding the pedestal. Seated above angled gables are eight commemorative panels of alternating cartouches with peaked terminals and arch faceplates. In rotational order:

  • 1887
  • The Jubilee Clock / Was Refurbished In 1996 / As Part Of / Douglas Corporation’s Centenary / Celebrations. / It Was Recomissioned At A / Ceremony Performed By The / Worshipful The Mayor, Mr. Councillor / D.W. Christian J.P. / On Sunday 22nd September / 1996.
  • Queen
  • A bust of Queen Victoria
  • Victoria
  • Presented / by / George William Dumbell / as a Jubilee gift / to the / Town of Douglas / June 1887
  • Jubilee
  • A bust of Queen Victoria

A two tiered acroter supports an attic base with four slender columns. The column capital supports a four sided clock bound by decorative spandrels. The acroteria is edged with elaborate scroll relief, and at each corner is an acorn finial, a symbol of life and immortality. The structure is surmounted with a decorative openwork corona terminating in a ball finial. A chiming bell cast by John Taylor & Co. of Loughborough, England is suspended in the centre of the corona. The 8-day clock mechanism was hand cranked and used a descending weight in the column. It was converted to electricity in 1965. The four clock faces originally lit by small gas jets were also converted to use electricity.

The clocks were dispatched to England for restoration in 1996 at which time an electronically operated mechanism and chime was installed.

On 20 September 2002 the structure was registered on the Protected Buildings Register.

In 2012 an application was made to move the clock tower to ease traffic flow. The move of eight metres has centrally positioned it in the street and enabled pedestrians to walk around the clock. Moving the clock tower, which weighs five tons, and seating it on a circular marble plinth, took two days. The feat was completed on 25 October 2013.

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
  • Corona, a crown
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Gable, triangular portion of a wall between edges of a dual pitched roof
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Spandrel, the triangular space between two arches
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal
  • Trefoil, An ornamental design of three rounded lobes

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Broadway Fountain

Location: Orangeville, Ontario

“In 1863 a by-law was passed to prohibit cows and pigs from running on the streets. There was no mention of hens.”

In 1875 the Newton log house was demolished, and a town hall was constructed to operate as municipal offices and as a farmers’ market which was the only legal place to sell meat. Steer mascarons are still part of the structure and are visible above the doors and windows.

The fountain which is situated outside the Town Hall on Broadway was part of a set that once graced the street. The other was demolished for much needed scrap metal during World War II. It is currently used as a planter.

The structure offered fresh water to humans, horses and dogs. On one side two taps fed water into a large horse trough. The other side hosted a vertical basin for human consumption. The water run-off fed into a small basin at ground level for dogs and smaller animals.

The structure is seated on a two tiered rectangular base bolted to a concrete plinth. The drinking fountain is attached to the trough by consoles decorated with scrolls and trefoil relief. An embossed palmette forms the design on the back and interior of the fountain. The terminal is a palmette.

The manufacturer’s stamp is visible on the base, Canada Foundry Co. Limited, Toronto.

Glossary
Console, a decorative bracket support element
Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal
Trefoil, An ornamental design of three rounded lobes

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Warrenpoint Fountain

Location: Warrrenpoint, County Down

In the late 19th century, Major Hall, owner of Narrow-water Castle and landlord of the town, donated 7 acres of land to provide sanitation and drinking water to the town. The Warrenpoint Waterworks, later to be known as Donaghaguy Reservoir, was formally opened on 22 April 1876. Mr. Barton, Civil Engineer, presented a drinking fountain to the town.

This fountain was casting #7 from Walter MacFarlane’s catalog and produced by the Saracen foundry in Glasgow, Scotland. The font was a single pedestal basin with four decorative columns rising from a two tiered square plinth. Four salamanders descended the fountain pedestal as a symbol of courage and bravery. The basin had a scalloped edge and decorative relief. A central urn with four outstretched tendrils offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The terminal was a crane recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

The last 3 images reveal that the crane and drinking cups have been removed. The fountain was still in existence although not in use in the early 1950s. Its demise is not known although there is a rumour that it rests in a private garden.

Glossary:
Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal 

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Weinbauer Fountain

Location: Weinplatz, Zurich

Weinplatz is the oldest market square in Zurich. Grapes were transported here to be pressed; often in a tub carried on the vintner’s back. The drinking fountain, which originates from springs and is claimed by locals to be as pure as bottled mineral water, was erected in 1909. The German word Weinbauer is translated as Vintner, or wine grower.

The drinking fountain is seated on a circular plinth. The circular stone pedestal with attic base is a reservoir for water which falls from two pipes extruding from the mouths of lion masks. The pedestal is surmounted by a cast iron canopy with five columns. The column capitals are a stylized design which represents grapes on the vine. This design is replicated at the peak of the dome and in the finial at the apex. Cartouches in the centre of each arch display a mascaron with a smiling face. The ribbed dome is open filigree with spiral design. The ribs culminate in an orb and a spike which supports the official flag of Zurich.

The font contains a stone stanchion supporting a statue of a vintner carrying a tub of grapes on his back. He is wearing a short tunic open to the waist, a hat, ankle boots, and he carries a walking stick in his left hand.

Glossary
Attic base, a column base with two rings
Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
Filigree, fine ornamental work
Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
Mask/Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
Vinter, winemaker

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Townsend Drinking Fountain

Location: Glenelg, Adelaide, S.A.

A drinking fountain erected in Colley Reserve was presented to the Mayor by William Townsend, Esq., M.P., on October, 1877. The fountain which was a replica of the Formby Fountain at Port Adelaide was erected at the centre of the reserve running parallel with the northern seawall and the HMS Buffalo cannon. It was officially opened by Mrs. Townsend who stated, ‘I now declare the fountain open to the Mayor, burgesses and the public generally, and as we learn from the best authority that cold water is to the thirsty soul, so is good news from a far country, so often while people are drinking the water here they will see the mail coming in bringing news from the far countries.’

The fountain was relocated to the front garden of Partridge House which had been rescued from demolition in 1971 by the Glenelg Council. It was recorded as a State Heritage Place in the SA Heritage Register on November 1986.

Casting number 8 from William MacFarlane’s catalogue is seated on a two tiered plinth. It is 9 feet 6 inches high and consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals united with arches formed of decorated mouldings. The griffins no longer exist on the structure.

Cartouches contained within each lunette host the image of a crane, and an open bible displaying a verse from St. John’s Gospel chapter 4 verse 14, Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst.’ Crests within the lunettes offer dedication and coats of arms. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep the pavement dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome; the original apex was an imperial crown which was later replaced with a gas lit lamp.

Under the canopy stands the font (casting number 6) 4 foot 11 inches high, a single pedestal with four decorative columns rising from an octagonal base. Four salamanders descend the fountain pedestal as a symbol of courage and bravery. The basin has a scalloped edge and decorative relief. A central urn with four projecting tendrils offer drinking cups suspended by chains. The terminal was a crane. Water flowed when a knob beneath the spout was pressed. The urn has been replaced with a bubbler. The font’s terminal which was a crane is also no longer present on the structure.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary
Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

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Myers Drinking Fountain

Location: Savannah, Georgia

In 1897 Mayor Herman Myers donated a drinking fountain to the City of Savannah for use by humans. It was erected in Forsyth Park. The single column pedestal was 9’ 5” tall with drinking basins and faucets. A multi-tiered acroter supported a 36″ tall statue of a woman feeding a dove. The sculpture is attributed to bronze founder George Fischer, and cast by J.W. Fiske, identified as Girl Feeding Bird #226. A bird perches on her right wrist as she gathers a tunic at her left hip with her left hand. Her head is tilted slightly back and she holds a seed in her mouth. The fountain was removed from Forsyth Park in the 1980s.

In 1983 a structure resembling the lower portion of the original fountain was installed at Troup Square. Whether the fountain was re-engineered or the base reproduced is uncertain. The current fountain is seated on a square base with a single pedestal containing four inset panels. Each panel displays a stylized floral pattern and on two sides at ground level is a demi basin for small animals. A multi-level acroter supports an enclosed vase with orb terminal.

An annual ceremony known as the Blessing of Pets is held each October 4th (the Feast of St. Francis, Patron Saint of animals) at the fountain.

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

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Leach Memorial Fountain

Location: Sturminster Newton, Dorset

This 8 foot high cast iron fountain in the form of a multi-tiered rectangular column has a square base with chamfered corners and apertures at ground level which previously contained troughs for dogs. The attached horse trough is seated on a ceramic brick base.

A demi basin extends from the rectangular pedestal which contains four panels with bulrush relief and a lions’ head above a Tudor rose (the floral heraldic emblem of England.) A multi-level acroter has a terminal of two dolphins intertwined around a trident. An inscription is engraved on two sides. Erected to the / memory of / J. Comyns Leach, M.D. J.P. / who practised in this / town for over 40 years / and who died at sea / March 11th 1907 / aged 65 years / and of his son / E. Comyns Leach/ B.A. Surgeon / who died at Sierra / Leone June 17th 1902 / aged 33 years.

J. Comyns Leach died on the S.S. Argonaut between Malta and Port Said. His obituary stated that he had a sympathic disposition which won the esteem and regard of all. He was a highly educated doctor who practised medicine in Sturminster for over 40 years and held many titles in the medical field. He was also a published author as well as a Justice of the Peace for the County. At the time of his death he held the appointment of County Coroner, County Analyst and Medical Officer for Heath for the District of Sturminster.

The fountain was listed a Grade II historic building on 20 October 1983.

The structure has been identified by British Listed Buildings as a casting by Mitchell and Sons of Bristol. However, it closely resembles the designs of Andrew Handyside’s Brittania Ironworks, specifically design number 24.

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Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 

 

 

Harrisonburg Fountain

Location: Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA

In 1904 the National Woman’s Christian Temperance Union encouraged local chapters to erect fresh water fountains in public venues. The black-painted cast iron drinking fountain located at the southern side of the Court House Square regularly quenched the thirst of citizens as they attended Court or visited the downtown area on business.

An octagonal base supports a single pedestal with attic base. The pedestal lacking any form of decoration rises to an acroter which supports a two tiered octagonal column decorated with floral relief. Lion masks spout water into basins protruding from two sides. Metal cups which are no longer present were suspended by chains attached to rings. The original terminal is a 3 foot high statue of a woman holding a bird. The base at the front of the statue is inscribed with raised letters, “J. W. Fiske 26.28 Park Place New York.” The statue has been identified as Virtue.

After repeated vandalism the head of the statue was replaced in 1995. The head was stolen once again and the right hand holding the bird was also ripped off. Although the head was never found the hand and bird were recovered. The decapitated statue was removed from the fountain in 2004 and stored in the basement of the Rockingham County Courthouse.

The statue was restored by Fine Line Architectural Detailing funded by the Margaret Grattan-Weaver Foundation. The project for restoration includes making a cast of a statue from the same design atop a fountain located in Ligonier Borough, Pennsylvania. Once restored, the statue will be displayed inside the courthouse. The drinking fountain will remain outdoors and be operational.

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 

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Babylon Fountain

Location: Babylon, Long Island, New York

The drinking fountain in Babylon was erected at the intersection of Main Street and Fire Island Avenue/Deer Park Avenue. It was funded by the Women’s Exchange, a charitable organization formed to aid genteel women whose financial status had declined.

It was manufactured by Stewart Iron Works in Kentucky, referenced in their catalogue as ‘drinking fountain for man and beast #209’ with a cast iron base and bronze statue; the remaining structure was made of zinc.

On Memorial Day in 1897 a dedication ceremony was held with speeches and patriotic songs, and the American flag draping the fountain was removed. Water flowed from a spout in the base. It was considered a very handsome fountain which beautified the village.

A square base with four short columns supported a dog toothed acroter. Rosettes were carved into each panel between the columns. A single column pedestal contained four inset panels displaying two swans with raised wings that rested on an orb from which rose Neptune’s trident flanked by stylized flowers and bulrushes. Three sides of the structure contained a drinking vessel. At ground level there was a small trough for dogs surmounted by a sculptured dog kennel. A second kennel was also located on an adjacent side. A wide and deep trough decorated with acanthus was available for the use of horses (a dolphin like fish released water from its mouth into the horse trough.) A small basin for humans was decorated with large leaf pattern on the underside. A multi-tiered acroter supported a 36″ tall statue of a woman feeding a dove. Her head was tilted slightly back and she held a seed in her mouth.

In 1914 it was damaged when a trolley from a nearby hamlet overturned onto it. Three years later the State Health Department banned the use of public drinking fountains due to health concerns regarding infectious diseases. It was removed and a flagpole mounted in its place, and at this point in history the fountain became a lost item.

A duplicate fountain and statue was discovered in Ligonier, Pennsylvania, and in 2009 a local committee undertook the task of reconstructing the fountain and founded a Facebook page, The Babylon Village Historic Fountain Reconstruction Project. Due to fundraising, a Suffolk County grant, and the generosity of the people of Ligonier to permit their fountain to be disassembled and the parts cast into molds; a non-functioning replica of the fountain was reinstalled in front of the Village Historical Society on Main Street.

The official unveiling which took place on Memorial Day 2011 mimicked the original ceremony. The Mayor of Babylon, Ralph Scordino, thanked Ligonier Borough for its civic dedication, compassion, and commitment to the preservation of American heritage. A plaque next to fountain reads: this historical reproduction would not have been possible without the help and cooperation of the people of Ligonier, Pennsylvania.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base

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Image Sources

http://thebabylonvillagefountain.blogspot.ca/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Babylon-Village-Historic-Fountain-Reconstruction-Project/161195615969

http://www.newsday.com/long-island/li-life/babylon-s-new-replica-of-1897-fountain-1.2914213#2

Ligonier Fountain

Location: Ligonier, Pennsylvania, USA.

The research for this fountain was very interesting as it is linked to two other fountains. Although the drinking fountains themselves are not identical the terminals for all three hosted the same statue. A mold of the statue in Ligonier was cast to assist in the restoration of the fountains in Harrisonburg, PA and Babylon, NY.

Fundraising for a drinking fountain began in 1913 and on 21 June 1921 the structure was donated by the Ligonier Volunteer Hose Company #1. The fountain was 10 feet tall and provided drinking water for humans, dogs and horses. It was advertised as Man and Beast Fountain #209 by Stewart Iron Works Kentucky. It is located at the north side of the inner diamond facing North Market Street.

A square base with four short columns supported a dog toothed acroter. Rosettes were carved into each panel between the columns. A single column pedestal contained four inset panels displaying two swans with raised wings that rested on an orb from which rose Neptune’s trident flanked by stylized flowers and bulrushes. Three sides of the structure contained a drinking vessel. At ground level there was a small trough for dogs surmounted by a sculptured dog kennel. A second kennel was also located on an adjacent side. A wide and deep trough decorated with acanthus was available for the use of horses. A dolphin like fish released water from its mouth into the horse trough. A small basin for humans was decorated with large leaf pattern on the underside. A multi-tiered acroter supporting a 36″ tall statue of a woman feeding a dove is identified as Girl Feeding Bird #226. A bird perches on her right wrist as she gathers a tunic at her left hip with her left hand. Her head is tilted slightly back and she holds a seed in her mouth. The sculpture is attributed to bronze founder, George Fischer. The original colour scheme was green paint on the female figure and white paint on the bird.

The deep horse trough was removed circa 1999 due to concerns of possible drowning if a child fell in. Four years later in the winter of 2003, a State Department of Transportation vehicle destroyed the structure when the snow blade hit the fountain. The remains of the fountain were removed and stored in a garage until Stewart Iron Works was hired to repair it.

In 2009 the fountain was shipped to Stewart Iron Works in Covington, KY to be dismantled , cleaned and castings made for a replica in Babylon, Long Island, NY.

It was returned to Town Square in 2010, and a brass plaque was mounted documenting the donation by Ligonier Volunteer Hose Co. No. 1 firefighters in 1921.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base

 

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