Wyatt Fountains

Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Following the opening of the Throndon Reservoir in Adelaide in 1860, piped water was made available to households. Adelaide was a hot, dry, dusty city in which many worked outdoors in the blinding light and heat and water fountains were a priority for humans and horses.

During 1860 the Adelaide Municipal Council debated provision of drinking fountains. In March there was a proposal to install a fountain at the intersection of King William, Currie and Grenfell streets. Also that Hindmarsh, Victoria, and Light Squares would be suitable localities. The motion was sent to the Waterworks committee. ‘Municipal Council. Monday March 19’ (SA Register, 20 March 1860). Tenders were issued for simple and inexpensive drinking fountains which were produced by the G. Wyatt Foundry.

They are to stand about seven feet high, and consist each of an octagonal base relieved by sunken panels, a shaft, also eight-sided, and a simple but suitable cap. At a convenient height on the shaft a curved ornamental spout projects over a small shell-shaped basin, into which it is proposed to have a tiny stream of water continually falling from the spout, with a view of presenting to the thirsty wayfarer the pure element in the coolest possible condition. The water will on overflowing fall into a larger basin below, where dogs and other ‘inferior creatures’ privileged to be at large within the city may quench their thirst without let or hindrance.’ (SA Register, 1861)

The Council installed 13 of these fountains on Tuesday 12 February 1861.

  1. South Adelaide – Victoria Square, near the entrance opposite to the government offices
  2. South Adelaide – Victoria Square at the entrance to the southern portion of the square in the produce market;
  3. South Adelaide – At the City Bridge road, North Terrace;
  4. South Adelaide – King William Street, near the Bank of Australasia at the intersection of King Wm, Currie and Grenfell streets;
  5. South Adelaide – Hindley Street, corner of Leigh Street;
  6. South Adelaide – Rundle Street, corner of Gawler Place;
  7. South Adelaide – Light Square (near the northern entrance in each case);
  8. South Adelaide – Hindmarsh Square (near the northern entrance in each case);
  9. South Adelaide – Hurtle Square (near to the southern entrance in each case)
  10. South Adelaide – Whitmore Square (near to the southern entrance in each case)
  11. North Adelaide – At Wellington Square, near southern entrance;
  12. North Adelaide – O’Connell Street, corner of Childers Street
  13. North Adelaide – Kermode Street, opposite to the Scotch Thistle.
Corner of Rundle and Gawler Place 1872. No known copyright restrictions.  Source: http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/02000/B1908.htm

Corner of Rundle and Gawler Place 1872. No known copyright restrictions.
Source: http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/02000/B1908.htm

 

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Posted on June 27, 2015, in Architecture, Australia, Cast Iron, Drinking Fountain and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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