Lion Mascaron Pillar Fountains

Designed and manufactured by Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. this late 19th century design was advertised as Kennedy’s patent, self-closing, anti-freezing pillar fountain. It consists of a fluted cast iron cylindrical column with moulded domed cap and small finial resembling a pineapple.

Water was drawn from a well by a wind pump and delivered by gravity from a reservoir. The water which was released by turning a decorative knob was located directly above a lion mascaron spout. It was captured in a tin cup suspended on a chain from the domed top. A small demi-lune trough at ground level captured overflow water for the use of dogs. Some models used a lever on the side to release the water and had an integral bucket platform located just above the base of the column.

Capture

Clifton-on-Teme, Hereford & Worcester, England. Manufacturer’s stamp on the base, Glenfield Coy Ltd.

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. The instruction, Turn the Handle is redundant as the handle is missing. A legend beneath the lion mascaron states, Waste Not Want Not.

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Ticknall, South Derbyshire, England. Located east of Hayes Farmhouse. It was erected 1914 at the behest of Sir Vauncey Harpur-Crewe of Calke Abbey. Bucket platform & lever are visible.

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Washinborough, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. Located on the High Street this model contains an integral bucket platform. The manufacturer’s stamp is located beneath the lion mascaron, Glenfield & Kennedy Co. Kilmarnock.

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Source: Flickr/Alan Saxman

Port Stanley, Falkland Islands. Manufacturer’s name is visible on the rear.

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by R Williams

Kelso, Scottish Borders, Scotland. Currently located at Ednam House Hotel.

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Kilmun, Argyll & Bute, Scotland. Located within the church graveyard it is a unique example with the original cup and chain. A spigot projects from the lion’s mouth.

Midlem, Scottish Borders, Scotland. 

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Peebles, Scottish Borders, Scotland. 

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Stirling, Scotland. Dog trough at base. The manufacturer’s name is located on the column within the trough.

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Stromness, Orkney Islands, Scotland. This model contains an integral bucket platform and a modern tap.

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Moniaive, Dumfries& Galloway, Scotland. Located at the base of steps leading to a gated entrance to Glencairn Church Graveyard. Painted white with a lever on the side.

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Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Killala, Co. Mayo, Ireland. Located at Seaview Terrace, the manufacturer’s stamp is visible beneath the lion mascaron, Glenfield & Kennedy Co. Kilmarnock

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Source: Flickr/JohnnyG

Glossary:

  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

3 responses to “Lion Mascaron Pillar Fountains

  • John Byrne

    Hey there, thank you for this wonderful post, almost exactly what I was looking for. There is a beautiful example of these pillar fountains in Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland. It has recently been painted green again and I have volunteered myself to paint this the most historically accurate way possible. I’m pretty sure it should be mainly black with the flower on top, the handle, the writing and the lions head itself painted gold. However I remember my father telling me, and also reading, years ago that the the recessed bars and leaves on the crown and pillar are supposed to be painted gold as well, though I may be mistaken. I was hoping you could shed some light on the correct way to paint these pillar fountains. There are a few examples within a few miles of my house that I would love to correct. Thanks so much!

    John

  • HIS

    Response sent to your gmail account. Hope it helps.

  • Gary

    Hello, I’m hoping to restore our village fountain. Its a Glenfield and Kennedy, but it’s missing its bonnet, finial, and handle. Do you know of anyone who has made replica replacement parts for these fountains? Or where i might get an original replacement set? Great article. Thanks.

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