Category Archives: Canada

Queen Street Drinking Fountain

Location: Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada

To commemorate the centenary of the founding of the Province of Upper Canada, a cast iron drinking fountain was unveiled on Queen Street outside the Niagara Court House on July 16, 1892.

A large underground cistern beneath the drinking fountain supplied water for fire-fighting in the mid 19th century.

The fountain consists of a rectangular pedestal with a square chamfered base decorated with a form of egg and dart frieze. A panel on all four sides contains the stylized pattern of a flower. Beneath the cornice facing the sidewalk is a metal dedication plaque; Erected 1892 / In Commemoration Of The Founding / Of The Province Of Upper / Canada July 16 1792.  The side facing the street offers a small basin for dogs. The capital supports a small fluted basin currently operated with a bubbler type tap.

Glossary:

  • Bubbler, a fountain with a tap which ejects a stream of water
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfer, a beveled edge
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Quebec City Fountains

Location: Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

Quebec City, with the air of an old European city, is a UNESCO world heritage site. A favourite tourist attraction is the guided horse-drawn carriage ride through the Historic District of Old Quebec. There are several drinking fountain/horse troughs throughout the city to accommodate these working beasts that can drink 49 litres of water per day.

These structures were manufactured by Henry F. Jenks of Pawtucket, R.I. and stand on an octagonal plinth. A fluted circular moulding creates a trough at ground level for the use of dogs. The fluted pedestal with attic base rising from the center of the trough hosts two arched panels for dedication; the coat of arms of Quebec City is represented by a ship in full sail which signifies Quebec’s importance as a seaport, and the full sails symbolize strength and courage.

The capital which supports a large basin 56 inches in diameter capable of holding 100 gallons, is decorated with bas-relief fret. It is 4 feet 3 inches above ground level. A central jamb hosts bas-relief including 4 dolphins that spout water into the basin with the overflow falling to the trough below. The pipes within the fountain were constructed to resist freezing in cold temperatures. The finial is highly decorated with floriated relief and a studded band terminating in a globe with the same detail as the basin.

Glossary:

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

Market Square Fountain

Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

At the main gate to the Market Square stands the historic drinking fountain originally located at Five Corners. Joseph Heywood who owned 5 acres of property at this location installed a drinking fountain/horse trough there in 1885 to quench the thirst of tired horses hauling loads from rural Saanich to Victoria. It was replaced with another fountain in 1937 by Maurice Humber to celebrate the city’s 75th anniversary.

An informative plaque on the structure details its history.
Market Square Main Gate Fountain
This Historic Fountain Was Originally Erected Near The Turn Of The / Century At ‘The Edge Of Town’ Known As The Five Corners / Government Douglas Gorge And Hillside Streets / The Three Level Fountain Provided Water For Parched Travellers / And Their Thirsty Horses, As Well As Smaller Animals Such As Dogs / And Pigs On Their Way To Market/ The Fountain Was Removed To The City Work Yards In 1950 Where / It Languished Until It Was Restored When These Nine Heritage / Buildings Were Refurbished In 1975 To Create Market Square.

Seated on a square plinth is a single pedestal with attic base containing a small demi-lune basin on two sides for the use of dogs. Two large demi-lune fluted horse troughs located above supplied the dog basins with overflow water. The front of the fountain has an extended arm supporting a basin for human use. A panel with bas-relief displays the figure of a classically robed woman holding a cup. Egg and dart moulding sits below the cornice.

Glossary:

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

Queen Victoria Diamond Jubilee Fountain

Location: Walkerton, Ontario, Canada

Donated by Hiram Walker & Sons to the town of Windsor in 1897, the drinking fountain was erected on the west side of Second Street, south of the Lake Erie & Detroit River Railway Station. Mayor Reid introduced Mrs. Edward Chandler Walker, wife of the eldest surviving son of Hiram Walker, who laid the cornerstone of the structure with a silver trowel.

The fountain, designed by prolific and famed Detroit architect Albert Kahn, was created from Amherstburg limestone. The base at the front of the fountain displays an inscription:
“To Commemorate / The Completion Of The Sixtieth / Year Of The Glorious Reign Of / Her Most Gracious Majesty / Queen Victoria / The Gift Of / Hiram Walker & Sons Limited To / The People Of Walkerville. MDCCCXCVII

Four stone columns support a copper roof which was once terminated with an imperial crown. Beneath the cornice extending around all four sides of the fountain is an inscription:
Her Court Was Pure, Her Life Serene / God Gave Her Peace, Her Land Reposed / A Thousand Claims To Reverence Closed / In Her Mother, Wife And Queen.

Positioned under the canopy is a stone font containing a circular stone pedestal. A cast iron baluster engraved with acanthus and foliate supports a terminal with 4 lion mascarons facing the four points of the compass. Water which spouted from the lion mouths was once captured in tin cups.

A stone horse trough which was located at the kerb was removed in the 1930s. Neglect caused three of the water spouts to stop functioning and a spigot was attached to the remaining mascaron. The copper roof deteriorated and the crown disappeared from the apex.

walkervilletimes

In 1958 the fountain was relocated to the gardens behind Willistead Manor in Walkerville. It was restored in 1990 to its original design with the exception of the imperial crown.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Baluster, a moulded shaft offering support
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid
  • Stanchion
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Queen Victoria Memorial

Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Located in Stanley park near the Vancouver Rowing Club, this drinking fountain memorial was erected a year after Queen Victoria’s death. The project was funded by school children selling black edged memorial cards that recorded the Queen’s birth, coronation and death. A gala concert was also held.

The memorial, constructed with Nelson granite at the top of a flight of steps, was unveiled by the Premier Sir Richard McBride in 24 May 1906 (the Queen’s birthday).

On each side of the memorial are pillars embedded with a crest. The shield on the right hand side is the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom and may be used only by the Monarch. On the left, the shield displays entwined serpents; this is the coat of arms for the City of Vancouver designed by James Bloomfield.

The drinking fountain flanked by stone seats is embedded in a granite column. The bronze bas-relief was designed by James Bloomfield and cast in England. The left facing cameo of Queen Victoria’s head is the same image used on the 1897 Diamond Jubilee medals and medallions.

The inscription states, In Memory Of / Victoria The Good / This Monument Is / Erected By The / School Children / Of Vancouver 1905.

Beneath the inscription is a lion mascaron with flowing mane that spouts water into a demi-lune basin. The original drinking cups suspended by chains are no longer present.

Glossary:

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

 


W. C. T. U. Fountain

Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada

The white and gold drinking fountain, seated on a square plinth at the edge of the sidewalk alongside the Bank of Commerce on High Street West, was erected by the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U.) in 1907. Ten feet tall it consisted of a square column surmounted by a statue. Four square panels at the base contained bas-relief of two intertwined sea serpents. One of the panels offered a fluted demi-lune basin with a dog head mascaron that spouted water, for the use of dogs and small animals.

A second level of rectangular panels outlined with ‘egg and tongue’ moulding rose above a chamfered edge decorated with rosette fret. On two panels the bas-relief was sculptured with two swans with raised wings resting on an orb from which rose Neptune’s trident flanked by stylized flowers and bulrushes. The remaining two sides contained a horse trough with a large lion mascaron from which water spouted; and a drinking basin for humans, displaying only bulrushes, the leaves of which decorated the basin. Tin cups were suspended on chains. Above the arched recess was bas-relief of ivy leaves.

An upper and lower cornice with rosette and acanthus frieze bordered a third level of panels. The bulrush theme was repeated in horizontal bas-relief. The acroter was stamped with W.C.T.U. flanked by two ribbons. The capital supported a 36″ tall statue of a maiden feeding a bird, identified as #226 Girl Feeding Bird.  A bird perches on her right wrist as she gathers a tunic at her left hip with her left hand creating a pouch containing seeds. Her head is tilted slightly back and she holds a seed in her mouth. The sculpture is attributed to bronze founder, George Fischer.

The manufacturer’s stamp was visible on the octagonal base of the statue, J. W. Fiske / 26.28 Park Place / New York. The sculpture is attributed to George Fischer, bronze founder.

For detailed photos of how the original fountain looked, go to this link to see the same casting design. https://memorialdrinkingfountains.wordpress.com/?s=anacortes

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfer, a beveled edge
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design

 

 


Lewis Fountain

Location: Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada

At the northwest corner of Main and Argyle Streets (once known as Moody’s Corner) near the waterfront is the Lewis Fountain also known as the South End Fountain. It was donated as a gift to the Town of Yarmouth in 1895 by Nathan B. Lewis, a prosperous ship owner and merchant whose businesses operated on Argyle Street. The fountain, commissioned from a design by J.L. Mott Iron Works of New York, was erected on 6th May 1895.

Circa 1895. Used with permission, Photo courtesy of the Yarmouth County Museum and Archives.

Circa 1895. Used with permission, Photo courtesy of the Yarmouth County Museum and Archives.

Circa 1911. Used with permission. From Souvenir of the 150th Anniversary of the Settlement of Yarmouth Nova Scotia - Nova Scotia Archives — Library no. V/F vol. 262 no. 14

Circa 1911. Used with permission. From Souvenir of the 150th Anniversary of the Settlement of Yarmouth Nova Scotia – Nova Scotia Archives — Library no. V/F vol. 262 no. 14

archive

The cast iron structure is seated on an octagonal base with chamfered corners. Originally there were 4 small basins at ground level to allow dogs to drink and two large troughs to quench the thirst of horses and cattle.

Eight panel, surmounted with scalloped arches, host dolphin masks from which water spouted into four basins decorated with laurel leaves. A square central column displays three cartouches containing an orb surrounded by flourish. The fourth cartouche is an engraved plaque which reads: Presented / To The / Town Of Yarmouth / By / Nathan B. Lewis And Wife / May1st 1895. Each corner is bound with a highly decorated pilaster.

A plaque identifies the structure with the legend, Town / Of / Yarmouth / Heritage Property. The fountain was recorded as a Registered Heritage Property on June 12, 1984.

The terminal is an elaborately decorated four tiered urn capped with an acorn finial. Acorn motifs symbolize that the roots of a family or institution are old and deep.

During World War II the fountain was removed possibly with the intention of reducing it to scrap metal for the war effort. However, thanks to the determination of a Lewis family member it was returned to Moody’s Corner.

With the advent of the motor vehicle the fountain became an obstacle. After being damaged in several collisions, it was removed in the 1950s and recast before being relocated to its current location. Although a constant flow of water from Lake George originally fed the fountain, it is no longer connected to a water supply.

NOTE: Another drinking fountain existed in Yarmouth on Forest Street. A ‘lost’ fountain, this structure resembles a J. W. Fiske Foundry casting. It was removed in the early 1940s after being hit by a car. Drinking fountains were often placed in the middle of busy horse traffic intersections where they eventually became an obstacle to vehicular traffic. It is believed that the structure was sent to a foundry for repairs but there is little known of this fountain’s history.

Glossary

  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
  • Chamfered, a beveled edge connecting two surfaces
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Mask/Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal