Category Archives: McDowall Steven & Co. Ltd

Harlesden Golden Jubilee Clock/Fountain

Location: Harlesden, London, England

harlesden-mcd,s-1890--hurst

Known as the Clock Tower this structure located in the High Street was originally also a drinking fountain. It was erected in 1888 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee which had been celebrated a year earlier.

With the advent of the motor vehicle it became a traffic hazard; at least two trams derailed and collided with the clock which resulted in one of the four decorative arms being damaged. As a result, on 20th March 1939 the Clock Tower was relocated three metres from its original position to ease navigation in the area.

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The basins no longer appear on images of this time period.

7-lamps_pinterest_1409The shape of the lanterns has changed and they no longer have crown terminals. Possibly due to the transition to electric light.

8-lamps2_pinterest_3145The image above shows that the lamps have been replaced again. The shape has changed and the glass is now frosted/opaque.

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The image above is from the 1950’s era. The lamps no longer exist and the structure has been painted red.

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Used with permission, John Moone. Source:http://www.themoones.co.uk/nw10.html

Circa 60s -70s and there is no weather vane visible.

The Jubilee Clock was recorded as a Grade II listed building on 23 Jan 1974. The tower was renovated in 1992 and again in 1997 when it was painted red, gold and black.

In 2014 the structure was temporarily removed as part of a £4.5 million regeneration project of the town centre. The Jubilee Clock, refurbished in its original colour scheme, was unveiled on 14 February 2015 at the new semi-pedestrian section of the High Street.

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The original structure manufactured by Steven Bros & Co. of London and Glasgow was seated on a square plinth with two dog troughs at ground level. Two large demi-lune basins protruded from the pedestal beneath which a dedication was inscribed: Erected by public subscription A.D. 1887. Directly above was the maker’s nameplate, Steven Bros. & Co. London & Glasgow.

An additional dedication on the base presumably refers to members of the committee that managed the project; C. J. Class Esq. Chairman / John Soper Esq. Treasurer / C. Coldney-Cary Esq. Sub / Jas Maxwell Esq. Committee / Wm. Orme Wedlake Esq. / Hon. Secretary

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Four dolphins at each corner of the stanchion created sections decorated with a shell pattern, floral relief and a crest above which were a crown and two rosettes. Two drinking cups were suspended on chains.

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Creative Commons License, Mike Quinn. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2751729

The capital supported a fluted lamp pillar with attic base. The pillar was decorated with swags, a shield bearing a cross and stylized flowers flanked by leaves. Four consoles offered a gas light source from a glass paned lantern the top of which was decorated with palmette relief and a terminal resembling castle turrets.

Four beaded consoles divided by a flower sat just beneath the four clock faces. Each clock panel was bound by fan spandrels. A gable roof was adorned by a spike at each peak and bas-relief of a crown in the pediment.

A closed urn with 4 knob pendants originally supported a weather vane with directional compass points and a directional arrow with butterfly wings.

Note of thanks and appreciation: I would like to acknowledge John Bolton from the Scottish Ironwork Foundation who brought my attention to this structure and who has been a welcome, boundless, source of information and assistance on many of my posts on items manufactured by Scottish Iron Foundries. 

Glossary:

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Gable, triangular portion of a wall between edges of a dual pitched roof
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pediment, an element in architecture consisting of a gable placed above a horizontal structure supported by columns
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Spandrel, the triangular space between two arches
  • Stanchion, upright bar, post or frame providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal
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White Memorial Fountain

Location: Denny, Stirlingshire, Scotland

In 1892, the White family donated a drinking fountain to the town of Denny. It was erected near Denny Old Parish Church at Broad Street in the junction of Denny Cross.

Two years later, a family member, Mr. James B. White, gave £100 to the Town Council to create a fund from which the accrued interest would pay for annual maintenance of the cast iron fountain.

The relevance of the drinking fountain declined in the early 20th century when it became an obstruction due to an increase in motor traffic, and the waning use of the structure as a source of water. In 1940, Mr. W. T. White of Fort Wayne, Indiana, the only living relative of the donor, was contacted for permission to remove the fountain due to the urgent national need for iron for the war effort. The fountain was removed in 1941.

The fountain manufactured by Messrs. Steven Bros. & Co. of the Milton Ironworks, Glasgow and London was seated on a square stone plinth.

A square base housed small demi-lune basins at ground level for dogs, and on four sides a large quatrefoil basin for horses was fed with overflow water. The highly decorated stanchion and central column were decorated with acanthus and floral relief. Lion mascarons, a symbol of guardianship, spouted water from which humans drank using metal cups suspended on consoles. A dolphin, symbolizing guardians of water, flanked each side of the stanchion.

The base of the lamp column contained four mascarons crowned with a shell motif. A Corinthian column supported a central gas lantern surmounted with a knob finial. By 1917 the central lamp had been replaced by three smaller globes. A dedication plaque contained an inscription acknowledging that the fountain had been presented by the White Family.

Sco_Broad st Denny

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Column Corinthian, a fluted shaft with flowers and leaves at the capital.
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

 


Sidney Column

Location: Southampton, Hampshire, England

A cast-iron drinking fountain with gas lamp erected at the junction of Six Dials in St Mary’s district was presented in 1882 by Councillor  Jonas Nichols to the Borough of Southampton. Nichols, a builder and railway contractor, commissioned the fountain to commemorate his son, Sidney, attaining the age of majority which at that time was 21 years. Nichols drank the first cup of water after it was unveiled.

It was relocated opposite the Kingsland Market in 1904 and remained at this location until 1954 when it was returned to Bevois Street sporting an electric lamp. Recorded as a Grade II listed building in 1981, it currently resides at the west end of Bevois Street in Jonas Nichol’s Square off St Mary’s Street.

In 2012 the City of Southampton Society donated approximately £5000 towards the refurbishment of the fountain as the structure had badly deteriorated.

The design was manufactured by Messrs. Steven Bros. & Co. of the Milton Ironworks, Glasgow and London (later to be known as McDowall, Steven & Co.’s Milton Works). The structure was originally seated on an ornamental plinth approximately 3 feet square standing upon a Portland stone base surrounded with granite stone kerbing. Between the kerbing and the base, bricks formed a radiating pattern 12 feet in diameter.

The drinking fountain supplied fresh water to animals and humans. Lion mascarons, a symbol of guardianship, spouted water that humans drank using metal cups suspended on consoles. On four sides a large quatrefoil basin for horses was fed with overflow water. A square base housed small demi-lune basins at ground level for dogs.

The highly decorated stanchion and central column were decorated with scrollwork, octupuses, starfish, and poppies. A dolphin, symbolizing guardians of water, flanked each side of the stanchion. The capital was inscribed with the legend, Presented To The Town / Of Southampton By / J. Nichols, Esq. / In Commemoration / Of His Son Attaining / His Majority / 28th June 1882.

The bulbous base of the 22 feet high lamp column contained four mascarons alternated with acanthus rising to a fluted Corinthian column enriched with leaves and fruit. The terminal was a gas lamp with Sugg’s patent three flame burners.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Column Corinthian, a fluted shaft with flowers and leaves at the capital.
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Dean’s Lamp/Fountain

Location: Montrose, Angus, Scotland

Dean Park, located at Mid Links near Academy Square, contains a 19th century lamp/fountain combination known locally as Dean’s Lamp. It is adjacent to the statue of Robert Burns on the path between Marine Avenue and Churchyard Walk. The park and lamp were probably (I have been unable to discover relevant data) named after the Dean of Guild, a group of burgh magistrates who were responsible for buildings.

The design, manufactured by McDowall, Steven & Co. Glasgow, supplied fresh water to animals and humans. It is seated on a square stone plinth. A square base houses small demi-lune basins at ground level for dogs, and four large quatrefoil basins for horses. The pedestal is inscribed, ‘The Deans Lamp 1881’.

The highly decorated stanchion and central column are decorated with acanthus and floral relief. Lion masks, a symbol of guardianship, spouted water from which humans drank using metal cups suspended on consoles. A dolphin, symbolizing guardians of water, flank each side of the stanchion. The base of the lamp column contains four mascarons crowned with a shell motif.

The Corinthian column supports a central lantern flanked by two additional lanterns on elaborate palmette consoles. The six sided glass pane lanterns were capped with a ball and spike finial.

It was recorded as a Category C listed building on 30 March 1999. Restoration of the structure in 2002 included repainting the cast iron and installing lanterns to resemble the original design.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Column Corinthian, a fluted shaft with flowers and leaves at the capital.
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

 


T. R. Scarfe Drinking Fountain

Location: Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, South Australia

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Scarfe J.P. were both present for the dedication of a commemorative drinking fountain erected in 1909 under the large Moreton Bay tree near the director’s residence (Summer House on Trellis Walk.) During an informal opening, the fountain was handed over to the chairman of the board of governors and the director.

The fountain replaced a cluster of aloes within the gardens which had been defaced by people carving their names into the thick leaves. Cool water ran continuously, and the overflow ran down the watercourse into the lily pond. The fountain was extremely popular and well used by hundreds of thirsty people who formed lines to fill jugs and bottles.

Casting number 12 was manufactured by McDowall, Steven & Co Ltd, Milton Iron Works, Glasgow, Scotland. The 7’ 6” high structure was originally seated on a two tiered square stone plinth. A pedestal with highly decorated stanchion is flanked on each side with a dolphin, symbolizing guardians of water; and a lion mask (another symbol of guardianship) on all fours sides. Water spouting from lion mascarons was collected in tin cups suspended on chains. The sculptured quatrefoil basins now contain bubblers. The capital supports an urn.

Glossary

  • Bubbler, a fountain with a tap which ejects a stream of water
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Mask/Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

Le Cinque Lampade Fountain

Location: Leith Walk, Edinburgh, Scotland

There were five streets at the Foot of Leith Walk: Duke Street; Great Junction Street; Constitution Street; Kirkgate and Leith Walk. In this location there was a drinking fountain with five ornamental lamps. The area was known by the Italian community as Le Cinque Lampade.

Circa 1891. Copyright City of Edinburgh Council. Source: www.capitalcollections.org.uk

Circa 1891. Copyright City of Edinburgh Council. Source: http://www.capitalcollections.org.uk

Copyright City of Edinburgh Council. Source: www.capitalcollections.org.uk

Copyright City of Edinburgh Council. Source: http://www.capitalcollections.org.uk

The casting, manufactured by McDowall, Steven & Co.’s Milton Works in Glasgow, was removed and many nearby buildings demolished to build North British Railways’ Leith Central Station which was completed in 1903. There was a belief that perhaps the structure was at the Dalton Scrap Metal Merchant on Constitution Street in Leith, but this has been refuted by the company. It is quite possible that this ‘lost’ fountain was melted during World War II to supply armaments for the war effort.

Circa 1900.  Copyright City of Edinburgh Council. Source: www.capitalcollections.org.uk

Circa 1900. Copyright City of Edinburgh Council. Source: http://www.capitalcollections.org.uk

The drinking fountain supplied fresh water to animals and humans. It was seated on a rectangular stone plinth. A square base housed small demilune basins at ground level for dogs, and four large quatrefoil basins for horses. The highly decorated stanchion and central column were decorated with acanthus and floral relief. Lion masks, a symbol of guardianship, spouted water from which humans drank using metal cups suspended on consoles. A dolphin, symbolizing guardians of water, flanked each side of the stanchion. The base of the lamp column contained 4 mascarons crowned with a shell motif. The Corinthian column supported a central lantern with four additional lanterns on elaborate palmette consoles. The six sided glass pane lanterns were capped with a ball and spike finial.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Column Corinthian, a fluted shaft with flowers and leaves at the capital.
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

A similar lamp structure was located at the junction of Princes Street and Waverley Bridge. It was most likely removed when electricity was introduced, and with the advent of the motor vehicle it would have been an obstacle.


Edward VII Fountain, Kilmarnock

Located in Kay Park, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland, this memorial fountain was erected in 1902 and listed as a category B Historic Building on 1 August 2002. It was manufactured by McDowall, Steven & Co Ltd.’s iron foundry, Milton Works, and is a four level structure with a square abacus separation.

The structure is seated on a circular concrete plinth. The manufacturer’s stamp is visible on the north and south sides, and on the east side is a small trough for animals. A square base offers a drinking trough for dogs and four large basins which protrude from the central column. The water is produced from ornamental taps.

A highly decorated stanchion supports a column, flanked on each side with a dolphin, symbolizing guardians of water, and a lion mask (another symbol of guardianship) on all fours sides. A smaller abacus supports a circular column containing panels on each side for commemoration. The Year 1902 is highlighted on each panel, and the north and south Panels contains the inscription: Presented to his native town by ex Baillie James Craig of Hillhead and Dean in Commemoration of the Coronation of King Edward and Queen Alexandra 1902. The East panel contains a bust of King Edward, and a bust of Queen Alexandra is displayed on the west panel.

The four scrolled feet resting on the uppermost abacus support a ball, upon which sits an eagle, a symbol of immortality. The apex is a crown finial supported by a rose, a thistle, a shamrock and a daffodil (the four national flowers of the United Kingdom.)

Glossary

  • Abacus, at the top of a capital, a thick rectangular slab of stone that serves as the flat, broad surface
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

Sources:

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/sc-48741-kay-park-edward-vii-drinking-fountain-

http://jane-aroundkilmarnock.blogspot.ca/2012/09/edward-vii-drinking-fountain.html?showComment=1380375395673#c4956196999017357508

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/76822153

http://www.flickr.com/photos/morguevanity/4319080365/