Category Archives: Queen Victoria Jubilee

Jubilee Fountain

Location: Coatbridge, North Lanarkshire, Scotland

The drinking fountain canopy standing on a two tiered concrete plinth at Summerlee Industrial Museum was originally part of the drinking fountain installed in Dunbeth Park, Coatbridge to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887. The ornately decorated canopy was known as the Jubilee Fountain.

geograph

Creative Commons License, Colin Smith. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1471807

The canopy was donated to Summerlee Heritage Trust by Monklands District Council Leisure and Recreation Department in 1989. It was restored by conservation engineers circa 1994-1996 and relocated to the Summerlee Museum. Many thanks to Jenny Noble, Social History Curator at CultureNL Ltd. who was very helpful in assisting with my research.

Design numbers 20 and 21 from Walter Macfarlane &Co.’s catalog were very similar, and with no pictorial evidence of the original structure including the finial and font, it is difficult to know for certain. However, John P. Bolton from the Scottish Ironwork Foundation is of the opinion that the design is #21 due to the fact that pattern number 20 was not available until the 1890s presumably for commemoration of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee of 1897.

Saracen #21

#21 from Walter Macfarlane &Co.’s catalog

Design number 21 (18 feet by 4 feet) was manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, Scotland. Seated on a two tiered octagonal plinth, the canopy is supported by eight columns with griffin terminals which are positioned over capitals with foliage frieze above square bases.

The highly decorated cusped arches are trimmed with rope mouldings which display lunettes with cartouches of a crane, a left facing profile of Queen Victoria and a dedication: Presented To The Burgh Of Coatbridge / By The / Building Trades / 22nd June / 1887. Directly above an arch faceplate provides a flat surface for inscription using raised metal letters; Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains.

Doves and flowers offer decorative relief on the circular, open filigree, ribbed dome. The internal capitals are floral ornament. The openwork iron canopy was originally surmounted with a vase and spiked obelisk finial.

Under the canopy stood the font, casting number 7. The 5ft 8ins high font was a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and descending salamander relief supporting a basin 2ft 6ins in diameter. The interior surface of the scalloped edge basin was engraved with decorative relief, and a sculptured vase was terminated by the figure of a crane. Four elaborate consoles supported drinking cups on chains. Water flowed from a spout into the drinking cup by pressing its edge against a projecting stud below the spout. The self-closing valve allowed for operation with only one hand.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions; lions are symbolic of guardianship; and doves are synonymous with peace. Cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance and are often depicted standing on one leg while holding a stone in the claws of the other foot. Legend states that if the watchful crane fell asleep the stone would fall and waken the bird.

Glossary

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cusped Arch, the point of intersection of lobed or scalloped forms
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Obelisk, a tall, four-sided, narrow tapering monument which ends in a pyramid-like shape at the top
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 

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Castleford Diamond Jubilee Fountain

Location: Castleford, Yorkshire, England

Queen’s Park was created in 1897 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. The fountain was installed in 1898. The bandstand which was built in 1900 remains; however, vandalism precipitated the removal of the drinking fountain in the 1950s.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow. The structure was 9 feet 6 inches high and consisted of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals united with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches within each lunette hosted the image of a crane, and an open bible displaying a verse from St. John’s Gospel chapter 4 verse 14, ‘Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst,’ or optional memorial shields. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure was surmounted by an open filigree dome, the finial being a crown with a pattée cross.

Under the canopy stood the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The terminal was a crane. The basin (2 feet 6 inches in diameter) which had a scalloped edge and decorative relief was supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The fountain was operated by pressing a button.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Queen Victoria Diamond Jubilee Fountain

Location: Fort Augustus, Inverness-shire, Scotland

The Victorian cast iron drinking fountain located at Victoria Gardens was originally located beside the Caledonian Canal at Fountain Cottage and relocated when Fountain Cottage was sold by the Caledonian Canal Company. It was erected to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee of 60 Years.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow. The structure is 9 feet 6 inches high and consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals unite with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches within each lunette host the left facing bust of Queen Victoria with an inscription using raised metal letters, Victoria Jubilee 1837-1897. The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome, the standard finial was a crown with a pattée cross. However, the absence of the crown may indicate that the canopy supported a lamp (I have been unable to find an image of the structure in its original location.)

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 7), 5 feet 8 inches high. The terminal was a crane which is now missing. The basin (2 feet 6 inches in diameter) which has a scalloped edge and decorative relief is supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The fountain was operated by pressing a button.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

 

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Melton Mowbray Golden Jubilee Fountain

Location: Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England

I have been unable to find any images of this drinking fountain; however, according to the Record Office for Leicestershire, Leicester and Rutland the design would appear to be a modification of #27 from the catalogue of George Smith & Co. described as a drinking fountain and lamp combined. It was installed on the footpath at the Market Place in Melton Mowbray to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887.

Sun_ 27

Manufactured at the Sun Foundry in Glasgow, the installation was completed by local companies, C. Barnes, builder; John Anderson, plumber & glazier; and the Melton Mowbray Gas Light and Coke Company. The pump was unpopular with local tradesmen who complained that children played in the water and threw water on the shop windows. It was removed to a local park named Play Close and later recycled during World War II to assist in the manufacture of armaments.

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain was a single pedestal with attic base that hosted a small trough at ground level for the use of dogs. Inset arched panels offered space for dedications, and the proposed design below includes a bas-relief profile of Queen Victoria. Two demi-lune basins were offered with drinking cups suspended by chains. Entablature with bolt consoles sat beneath an ogee cupola with panels of fleur de lys motif. The finial was a six sided glass pane lantern capped with a ball and spike finial. The image below appears to show a dedication inscribed on the base.

melton mowbray_jubileefountain

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

Town Hall Fountain

Location: Bridgnorth, Shropshire, England

The 17th century Town Hall consists of a half-timbered building and a town gate. It was renovated to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Silver Jubilee, and at the same time a drinking well operated by pump, was replaced with a drinking fountain mounted on the wall.

Casting number 15 (2 ft 9 x 1ft 9) from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s Saracen Foundry is a wall mounted drinking fountain with a fluted demi-lune basin. An arch faceplate, now blank, once bore the inscription “Keep the Pavement dry”. The interior of the arch contains a shell lunette from which a tap protrudes. Two doves represent the symbolism of the spirit drinking from the water of life. A single drinking cup on a chain is suspended on a decorative console.

flickr_eve2

Used with permission, Eve Parry. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12616079@N00/16382840639/

Glossary:

  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting

Jubilee Fountain and Trough

Location: West Linton, Scottish Borders, Scotland

The horse trough and Jubilee lamp located at the area of Bogsbank Road and Station Road known as church corner was originally erected at Raemartin Square. West Linton considered to be the biggest market in Scotland probably had need of a drinking fountain for cattle and their drovers.

The horse trough was design #12 manufactured by Walter Macfarlane’s Saracen Foundry in Glasgow. The structure is 6 feet 4 inches tall and the cast iron basin is 5 feet in diameter. The fluted central pedestal originally offered two drinking cups suspended on chains from two consoles. The structure which is supported by four horse hooves is capped with an acorn finial. A shield on the pedestal is inscribed; Broomlee Band Of Mercy / Erected / In Commemoration Of / Queen Victoria’s / Diamond Jubilee / June 1897 / Be Merciful / After / Thy Power

The lamppost accompanying the trough is design #146, and although this example stands as a separate form it was often offered as the central pedestal within the trough.

Glossary

  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Nowra Drinking Fountains

Location: Nowra, New South Wales, Australia

This post was originally intended to record the details of the Queen Victoria Jubilee drinking fountain; however, during research I discovered that three drinking fountains existed in the town.

JUBILEE FOUNTAIN
In 1897, there was contentious debate within the Council as to whether a drinking fountain should be erected to commemorate 60 years of reign by Queen Victoria. On the 23rd June in the same year, a large gathering assembled at the corner of Kinghorn and Junction streets to celebrate the unveiling of the approved fountain by the wife of Mayor Christopher Graham. It was a joyous event with the Nowra Brass Band accompanying the crowd as they sang the following songs between speeches; the Old Hundredth, Advance Australia, the National Anthem, and Rule Britannia.

The Nowra School of Arts committee made a request to Council on 10 Mar 1900 to remove the drinking fountain from its present position near the Commercial Bank, to the space in front of the hall. Alderman Morton opposed the idea, citing that it had been placed there for a purpose, and as the School did not pay rates, they had no right to make such a request.

The drinking fountain remained in situ, and for several years was neglected, deteriorating to an unsatisfactory condition. A suggestion was made in 1916 to move it from the corner at the Commercial Bank to the Recreation Ground. Due to the stated fact that some people preferred to drink water at the fountain instead of the nearby public houses, the proposal was defeated. The quest to relocate the fountain resurfaced again in 1930 with a submission to move it to Memorial Park at North Street and Bridge Road. Despite this proposal being accepted, the Jubilee Fountain was eventually moved to Nowra Showground.

An excerpt from the Shoalhaven Telegraph Wednesday 23 June 1897: The fountain stands on a base of sandstone and is some 6ft in height, is painted green with gold facings, and is supplied with two drinking mugs. The estimated cost, including erection, painting, etc, is about £17. The work of erection was carried out by Mr. J. Gibson. At the base is a brass plate bearing the following inscription:-
Erected June 22nd, 1897 / In Commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria / Graham, Mayor.

The fate of the fountain is unknown. The only photograph I could find offers a very unclear image. It is possible that it is design #6 from Geo. Smith & Son, cast in the Sun Foundry, Glasgow, Scotland.

Sun_font 6

Sun Foundry design #6

The fountain, 4ft. 10ins. high, was seated on a two tiered plinth. It featured a single pedestal basin with a base of four globular design elements transitioning into 4 small pilasters. A 2ft 2ins. diameter basin was decorated with a rope detail edge. In the centre of the basin was a sculptured urn with 2 shell motif spouts. Water was collected with two drinking cups suspended on chains from elaborate consoles. A pointed enrichment terminated the structure.

Glossary:

    • Console, a decorative bracket support element
    • Pilaster
    • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests

 

MONAGHAN MEMORIAL DRINKING FOUNTAIN
A drinking fountain was erected in the Nowra Showground on 14 February 1912 in memory of Mr. John Monaghan Esq. J.P., one of the founders of the Shoalhaven Agricultural Society, and a selfless public servant of 70 years with the Shoalhaven District. The fountain served the public with fresh drinking water.

Design number 7, standing 5ft 8ins, from Walter Macfarlane’s catalogue was manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow featuring a single pedestal basin with four pilasters rising from an octagonal plinth. Four salamanders descend the fountain pedestal as a symbol of courage and bravery.

The basin, 2 ft 6 ins in diameter, has a scalloped edge and decorative relief. The interior surface is engraved, and a sculptured urn is terminated by the figure of a crane, a symbol of vigilance. Four elaborate consoles once supported drinking cups on chains. Water flowed from a spout into the drinking cup by pressing its edge against a projecting stud below the spout. The self-closing valve allowed for operation with only one hand.

A plaque with inscription is located at the base of the urn within the basin.
Fountain Erected By The Public Of Shoalhaven To The Memory Of The Late John Monaghan Esq. J.P. First White Australian Male Child Born In The Shoalhaven District South Of The River Also One Who Rendered Invaluable Services In Advancing The Interests Of This District.

Glossary:

  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

BOER WAR MEMORIAL
In 1902, a marble monument to the Boer War which also housed a drinking fountain was erected in front of the Nowra School of Arts. It remained there until 1962 when it was relocated to Rauch Park in Junction Street, opposite the Shoalhaven Council Chambers. (Rauch Park, named after a local newspaper man Henry Rauch, was created in 1956.)

Boer War_southcoast register

Memorial can be seen on the right edge of image

boer war memorial

Boer War Memorial

An interesting article on the memorial is currently available at this link http://www.batemansbaypost.com.au/story/3910635/south-coast-boer-war-stories-come-to-life-video-and-photos/#slide=1