Category Archives: Sun Foundry

Ashton Park Fountain

Location: Preston, Lancashire, England

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain seated on an octagonal plinth is design #14 manufactured by George Smith & Co., Sun Foundry, Glasgow. The ogee shaped base and acroter support a single pillar with attic base and inset arched panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola. The structure is surmounted with an acorn shaped finial.

Two demi-lune basins originally offered a cup suspended on a chain for the use of humans, and at ground level, was a basin for dogs.

ashton park preston

Used with permission, Tony Worrall. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyworrall/875406715

The plaque on the base is engraved with the legend; Fredk Bird & Co. / Engineers & / Ironfounders / London W.

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

City Cemetery Drinking Fountain

Location: Belfast, Northern Ireland

The drinking fountain located midway between the vaults and the boundary wall was erected during the late 19th century (1880-1890).

Seated on a two tiered hexagonal granite plinth, the fountain is design number 13 by George Smith & Co. manufactured by the Sun Foundry. The base is in the form of a compass cross base with canted corners. It has a central pedestal and four columns decorated with diamond frieze and nail head molding which supported the font. The large basin has nail head relief on the rim and is partitioned by four foliate brackets from which cups are suspended on chains. Shell motif spouts on each side release water flow. The structure is surmounted with a chained orb terminal.

Glossary:

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Compass cross, a cross of equal vertical and horizontal lengths, concentric with and overlaying a circle.
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

Faversham Town Pump

Location: Faversham, Kent, England

Before the arrival of a piped water supply in 1864, local households were dependent for their supply of water on pumps and wells. The first pump on the site of the Market Place next to Guildhall, provided by a local benefactor in 1635, was replaced by the present elaborate cow tailed pump in 1855.

FAVERSHAM_1900_books google

Circa 1900

Although this pump design is illustrated as #8 in the catalogue of George Smith & Co., the company did not exist until 1858, and it is therefore likely that the pattern was purchased from an existing iron foundry (possibly Dartford Iron Works; as the owner, John Hall, also owned a paper mill and a gunpowder factory in Faversham.)

Design #8 from the catalogue of George Smith & Co. was described as a drinking fountain and lamp combined. This octagonal shaped drinking fountain (cow tailed pump) is a single pedestal with attic base and inset arched panels which offered space for dedications. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola with panels of fleur de lys motif. Yoke maintenance arms that originally supported the lamp-lighter are still in evidence. The original finial was a six sided glass pane lantern which no longer exists. The floral relief decorated column is capped with a ball finial. A small trough set into the base of the structure was for the use of dogs.

The structure was recorded as a Grade II historic building on 3 August 1972.

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of a street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder

Toll Green Pump

Location: Elie, Fife, Scotland

The cast iron structure at Toll Green in Elie often referred to as a drinking fountain was actually a cow tailed pump. It was erected in 1869 as engraved on the base; George Smith & Co Sun Foundry Glasgow 1869.

ELIE_1900s_flickr dodfather

Circa 1900. Used with permission. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dodfather/6583802409/

This octagonal shaped pump is design #8 from the catalogue of George Smith & Co. The single pillar with attic base hosted 8 inset arched panels of which six were for dedication. Two panels were used for the water spout and the cow tailed lever. When the pump was no longer used to supply water, these were removed and replaced with blank panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sits beneath an ogee cupola with alternate panels of fleur de lys motif.

A single column supported a six sided glass pane lantern which was capped with a ball and spike finial. The lamp has been replaced with an open sphere and spike finial atop a column with floral relief. Yoke maintenance arms that originally supported the lamp-lighter’s ladder are still in evidence. A small trough set into the base of the structure was for the use of dogs.

In 2001 Elie and Earlsferry Community Council raised funds to refurbish the pump as a millennium project. Acknowledged as the only remaining example of this design in Scotland, it was recorded as a Category C historic building on 9 August 2012.

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of a street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder

Melton Mowbray Golden Jubilee Fountain

Location: Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England

I have been unable to find any images of this drinking fountain; however, according to the Record Office for Leicestershire, Leicester and Rutland the design would appear to be a modification of #27 from the catalogue of George Smith & Co. described as a drinking fountain and lamp combined. It was installed on the footpath at the Market Place in Melton Mowbray to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887.

Sun_ 27

Manufactured at the Sun Foundry in Glasgow, the installation was completed by local companies, C. Barnes, builder; John Anderson, plumber & glazier; and the Melton Mowbray Gas Light and Coke Company. The pump was unpopular with local tradesmen who complained that children played in the water and threw water on the shop windows. It was removed to a local park named Play Close and later recycled during World War II to assist in the manufacture of armaments.

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain was a single pedestal with attic base that hosted a small trough at ground level for the use of dogs. Inset arched panels offered space for dedications, and the proposed design below includes a bas-relief profile of Queen Victoria. Two demi-lune basins were offered with drinking cups suspended by chains. Entablature with bolt consoles sat beneath an ogee cupola with panels of fleur de lys motif. The finial was a six sided glass pane lantern capped with a ball and spike finial. The image below appears to show a dedication inscribed on the base.

melton mowbray_jubileefountain

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

Beaumaris Castle Drinking Fountain

Location: Beamaris, Isle of Anglesey, Wales

The drinking fountain is located between Beaumaris Castle and the Happy Valley Pavilion. It was erected on 23rd June 1893 in the public pleasure grounds adjoining Beaumaris Castle by Alderman Thomas Hughes who later became Mayor.

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain seated on an octagonal plinth is design #14 manufactured by George Smith & Co., Sun Foundry, Glasgow. The ogee shaped base and acroter support a single pillar with attic base and inset arched panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola with alternate panels of fleur de lys motif. The structure is surmounted with an acorn shaped finial.

Originally, two demilune basins with a chain for a suspended cup offered water to humans, and at ground level was a basin for dogs.

geograph

Creative Commons License. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3716217

A plaque is inscribed with the legend; Presented / To The / Corporation / Of / Beaumaris / By Alderman / Thos. Hughes / 1893

flickr_wendy-harris

Used with permission, Wendy Harris. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pefkosmad/7468567498/

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

Edward Denis De Vitre Memorial Fountain

Location: Lancaster, England

Edward Denis De Vitre was a philanthropist with incredible community spirit. In 1840 he was Chairman of the Lancaster Gas Company. However, he is most famous as a doctor who in 1842 was a consulting physician at Lancaster Asylum and was a great proponent for the cause of the mentally afflicted. He became one of the founders of Royal Albert Asylum for Idiots and Imbeciles of the Northern Counties.

He was elected Mayor in 1843 and again in1855. In 1845 he was also active in the committee of the Lancaster Canal, and by 1853 he was Director of West Hartlepool Harbour and Railway Company. He was a Justice of the Peace for the Borough and County of Lancaster, and in 1864 he was elected President of the Lancashire and Cheshire Branch of the British Medical Association. It is not difficult to imagine why a large procession accompanied his coffin to the Lancaster Cemetery in 1878.

A drinking fountain and lamp was erected in his memory in 1880 outside the old town hall in Market Street. The structure was seated on a large square plinth bordered by four cast iron guard posts, and bore an inscription: Presented To The Shareholders Of The Lancaster Gas Company 1880 In Memory Of Edward Denis De Vitre , M.D., 40 Years Chairman Of The Company

It was relocated some time before 1903 per photographic evidence and installed in Queen’s Square near King Street until 1942 when it was permanently removed. An obstacle to motor traffic is the most likely reason for its removal, in addition to public awareness of water sanitation.

The fountain was design number 194 registered to George Smith & Co. manufactured by the Sun Foundry of Glasgow. The original structure was 17 feet 2 inches high. The pedestal with chamfered edge hosted four panels containing a lion mascaron with self-closing tap from which water spouted into demi-lune basins. Drinking water was captured in metal cups suspended on chains. Overflow water drained into small troughs at ground level for dogs.

A frieze of acanthus leaves was situated beneath the capital upon which there was a lamp standard with a base of four decorative scrolls. The pedestal had a bulbous base with bas-relief extending into a fluted column with bands. A two tiered acroter supported decorative yoke maintenance arms and a tapered hexagon glass lantern.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfer, a beveled edge
  • Compass cross, a cross of equal vertical and horizontal lengths, concentric with and overlaying a circle.
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of a street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder