Category Archives: Wales

Carmarthen Park Drinking Fountain

Location: Carmarthen, Wales

Carmarthen Park opened in 1900 and it is supposed that the drinking fountain located within the park near the Gorsedd Circle was erected in the same year.

geograph

Creative Commons License, Chris Whitehouse. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3230773

The fountain designed by the foundry of David King & Sons (Glasgow) was listed a Grade II historic building on 23 November 2003. It is seated in a concrete block on a two tiered octagonal plinth. The spiral fluted pedestal supports an octagonal capital decorated with alternate panels of rosettes and spigots. Four ornamental scroll consoles which protrude from the tapering shaft originally supported drinking cups. The finial is a tapered extension with two spheres.

The original design of this fountain offered a large circular basin. It is unknown if this model was customized or the basin was removed.

Glossary

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid

 

 


Beaumaris Castle Drinking Fountain

Location: Beamaris, Isle of Anglesey, Wales

The drinking fountain is located between Beaumaris Castle and the Happy Valley Pavilion. It was erected on 23rd June 1893 in the public pleasure grounds adjoining Beaumaris Castle by Alderman Thomas Hughes who later became Mayor.

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain seated on an octagonal plinth is design #14 manufactured by George Smith & Co., Sun Foundry, Glasgow. The ogee shaped base and acroter support a single pillar with attic base and inset arched panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola with alternate panels of fleur de lys motif. The structure is surmounted with an acorn shaped finial.

Originally, two demilune basins with a chain for a suspended cup offered water to humans, and at ground level was a basin for dogs.

geograph

Creative Commons License. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3716217

A plaque is inscribed with the legend; Presented / To The / Corporation / Of / Beaumaris / By Alderman / Thos. Hughes / 1893

flickr_wendy-harris

Used with permission, Wendy Harris. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pefkosmad/7468567498/

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

Archibald Hood Memorial Fountain

Location: Tonypandy, Rhondda, Wales

On Thursday October 28, 1909, a memorial fountain commemorating Archibald Hood J.P., a Scotsman who founded the Glamorgan Collieries, was unveiled in Pandy Square, Tonypandy. The fountain was erected using a surplus of the fund subscribed by the workmen and others towards a statue of Hood which had been placed in the grounds of the Workmen’s Institute at Llwynypia. Mr. Hood was greatly honoured, respected and loved throughout the whole of the South Wales coalfield.

The 13 feet high cast iron fountain, designed by Mr. R. S. Griffiths, a local architect, was manufactured by the Coalbrookdale Company. It was seated on a pedestal of Aberdeen granite and had three demi-lune basins into which lion mascarons spouted water. A drinking cup suspended on a chain was provided at each tap. The structure offered two demi-lune troughs at ground level for dogs and a large trough for horses and cattle. The central pedestal contained an inscription; This Fountain Is Erected In Conjunction With The Statue At The Workmen’s Institute, By The Workmen Of Llwynypia Colliery And Others As A Memorial To The Late Archibald Hood. Esq., J.P., Founder Of The Llwynypia Collieries. There was also an inscription in Welsh Y Cyfiawn A Fydd Ofalus Am Fywyd Ei Anifail (Diar. xii. 10.), from Proverbs XII.10: ‘What Feeling Has A Righteous Man For His Beast’.

The capital supported a statue of an Egyptian water carrier. Standing contrapposto,she was dressed in classical robes with her arms stretched upwards clutching a gas lamp atop the anticipated water jug. From the four corners of the capital dolphins lay at her feet (dolphins were considered guardians of all things water related.)

This famous Tonypandy statue was damaged and her arms broken when a car hit the fountain in 1965. The statue was repaired and erected outside the firm of W. Ribbons Limited remaining there until the factory closed. The ‘Lady With the Lamp’ was then relocated behind the War Memorial in Dunraven Street.

The fate of the fountain is unknown. In general, the location of many of these fountains became a hindrance to motor traffic, and public awareness of sanitation meant that many of these structures were demolished.

The statue continued to deteriorate until it was removed in 1993 with the intention of repair. However, it remained in storage until 2010. With money from the Civic Trust Wales, a project to restore and reinstate the statue was led by the Rhondda Civic Society. Nigel Snell of Acorn Restorations refurbished the statue, recreating missing parts by referencing photos of the original drinking fountain when it was officially unveiled in 1909.

The statue is now located not far from the site of its original location in a specially designed community garden in De Winton Street, outside the old Town Hall. It stands on a stone pedestal with the original legend inscribed beneath.

 

Many of the photos were found on the Facebook page, Tonypandy Past and Present.

Glossary

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Smithfield Cattle Market Drinking Fountain

Location: Welshpool, Powys, Wales

The economy of Welshpool which was based upon agriculture created the establishment of the Smithfield Livestock Market in 1863. Horses, cattle and dogs that travelled to local markets required water for drinking which created a need for water troughs. In the Victorian period the troughs were identified on maps and were referred to as filling stations.

The stone troughs at the Smithfield cattle market formed a moat that surrounded a cast iron drinking fountain accessed via three stone steps. The fountain was removed during World War II to be recycled as armaments. During the First World War the horse repository in Smithfield was used as a prisoner of war camp.

peoples

Used with permission, Creative Archive Licence. http://www.peoplescollection.wales/items/10915

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow. The structure was 9 feet 6 inches high and consisted of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals united with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches within each lunette host the image of a crane, or optional memorial shields. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure was surmounted by an open filigree dome, the finial being a crown with a pattée cross.

Under the canopy stood the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The basin which had a scalloped edge and decorative relief was supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The terminal was a crane.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Promenade Fountain

Location: Porthcawl, Wales

In the early 19th century Stoneleigh House on John Street was a girls’ boarding school and college. A cast iron drinking fountain was inset to the front wall surrounding the property.

peoples_stoneleigh

Creative Commons License. Source: http://www.peoplescollectionwales.co.uk/items/13157

The fountain was later relocated to the shelter on the promenade opposite the Seabank Hotel. Several of the original embellishments no longer exist and it is not functional at the present time.

The font, design number 17 (4 feet 5 inches high) from Walter Macfarlane’s catalogue, was manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, Scotland. The design utilizes features of the canopy used in drinking fountain number 8, and is surmounted by a palmette finial. Griffin terminals once flanked a highly decorated arch outlined with rope detail which also encircled a medallion hosting the image of a crane. The recessed interior of the arch contains a shell lunette from which a tap protrudes. A single drinking cup on a chain was suspended above a fluted demi-lune basin.

Saracen_Wall Font_Saracen 17

Original manufacturer’s design

Glossary

  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Edward VII Marriage Fountain

Set into a gabled ashlar wall at the northwest corner of St. David’s Church in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales is a cast iron drinking fountain commemorating the marriage of the Prince of Wales to Princess Alexandria of Denmark.

The cast iron frame is in the form of a stylized shield with curved and winged edges. The top part of the shield forms a lunette of a winged cherub resting upon clouds. Beneath the cherub is a recessed arch which contains the drinking well above which is a Biblical engraving.

Each side of the arch is decorated with ivy tendrils. On the left side is a seated figure of Jesus Christ pointing with his left hand to the engraved verses 13 and 14 of St John’s Gospel, Chapter IV. Jesus Said Unto Her, Whosoever Drinketh Of This Water / Shall Thirst Again: / But Whosoever Drinketh Of The Water / That I Shall Give Him, / Shall Never Thirst. / John, IV, 13.  14. To the right of the drinking well is a seated figure of the Woman of Samaria with her right hand resting on her cheek and her left hand on a tall urn.

A dedication inscription is located beneath the well, To Commemorate The Marriage / Of The / Prince of Wales / March 10th / 1868.  The scalloped lower edge of the shield is also engraved, Cast by the Coalbrookdale Co.

The fountain was designed by W. & T. Wills and manufactured by Coalbrookdale Company Ltd. It was listed a grade II historic building in 1988.

Glossary

  • Ashlar, finely cut stone
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting

Image Sources

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/stdavid’schurch.htm

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3002032

http://www.waymarking.com/gallery/image.aspx?f=1&guid=061f3d88-4fd0-4f72-bdf4-0419eac2c8e5

 


Wall Fountain, Cathays Park

The drinking fountain set into the wall at Kingsway (Boulevard de Nantes and Greyfriars Road at the bridge over the dock feeder canal) has moved several times since its initial installation in 1862. It was donated by Mayor William Alexander and installed in the wall of the Town Hall at St. Mary Street in Cardiff.

The cast iron frame is in the form of a stylized shield with curved and winged edges. The top part of the shield forms a lunette of a winged cherub resting upon clouds. Beneath the cherub is a recessed arch which contains the drinking well above which is a Biblical engraving.

Each side of the arch is decorated with ivy tendrils. On the left side is a seated figure of Jesus Christ pointing with his left hand to the engraved verses 13 and 14 of St John’s Gospel, Chapter IV. JESUS SAID UNTO HER, WHOSOEVER DRINKETH OF THIS WATER / SHALL THIRST AGAIN: / BUT WHOSOEVER DRINKETH OF THE WATER / THAT I SHALL GIVE HIM, / SHALL NEVER THIRST. / JOHN, IV, 12 . 14. On the right of the drinking well is a seated figure of the Woman of Samaria with her right hand resting on her cheek and her left hand on a tall urn.

Beneath the well is a dedication, ERECTED / BY / WM. ALEXANDER / MAYOR OF CARDIFF / A.D. 1860. The scalloped lower edge of the shield is also engraved, CAST BY THE COALBROOKDALE CO. Further engraving states, WILLS BROTHERS, SCULPTORS, LONDON.

The fountain was designed by W. & T. Wills and manufactured by Coalbrookdale Company Ltd. During planning of the Civic Centre, it was moved to Mill Lane in 1908, and once again relocated in 1952 to its present location. It was listed a grade II historic building in 1975.

Images Sources

https://www.flickr.com/photos/roath_park_mark/69113463/