Parkesburg Fountain

Location: Parkesburg, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA

In 1905 a fountain/horse trough was installed by Parkesburg Business Men’s Association on the north side of the railroad tracks at Main Street and Strasburg Road adjacent to the National Bank. Horses were tied to it while owners shopped on Main Street. The fountain was removed due to decline of use and the advent of the automobile. A memorial to local WW1 veterans was erected in its stead on Independence Day 1924.

Irvine Guest, a member of the Parkesburg Business Men’s Association took ownership of the fountain and placed it in storage. In 1955 the fountain was visible in the garden of Viola Hawk with a fresh coat of paint furnished by Ross Pierce. The fountain reappeared on a brick base at the intersection of Main Street and Strasburg Avenue directly across the street from Rocco’s and Anna’s fine Italian restaurant.

It was refurbished by Jeff Hery in the 1990s and disappeared in the summer of 2009. This historical artifact was removed during a dispute with the local government and is the personal property of a local resident who resides on the outskirts of town.

fred lauzus

Image supplied by Fred Lauzus

This drinking fountain/horse trough is a modification of a drinking fountain with lamp manufactured by M.D. Jones of Boston, Massachusetts. Seated on a square block with a small basin for dogs, this fountain is shaped in the form of an urn. It was seated on a square base with a fluted pedestal which supported a wide basin decorated with foliate frieze and a fluted cornice. Water was delivered via the mouths of lion mascarons on the short fluted pillar. The structure was terminated with an orb.

Glossary:

  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
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Hebburn Park Fountain

Location: Hebburn, Tyne and Wear, England

20 acres of land surrounding Hebburn Hall was used as a public park from 1897 until 1920. The land south of the Hall was then gifted to the town by Ralph Carr Ellison as a gesture after the safe return of his son from World War One. It was renamed Hebburn Park, and later renamed Carr-Ellison Park.

A drinking fountain erected at a junction of winding paths was still in existence in 1916 as identified on an ordnance survey map from 1916-17. It is unknown when or why it was removed.

With little historical information on the fountain the installation date is unknown, and therefore the manufacturer is uncertain. The original design was a Sun Foundry pattern later bought by the Lion Foundry when Sun closed business.

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An example of the same pattern in which the basins are more visible

The fountain (design number 41) was 12 ft 8 ins high and stood on a two tiered square plinth. The central column was decorated with palmette and acanthus relief.

Quatrefoil basins were supported by a square base with chamfered corners. Panels above each basin were decorated with floral relief divided into sections by a compass cross. The centre circle contained a lion mask with self-closing tap from which water spouted.

The capital supported a multi level acroter surmounted by the life size figure of a woman (Greek water carrier) dressed in flowing robes holding an olive branch in her left hand while supporting an urn on her head with her right hand.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfered, a beveled edge connecting two surfaces
  • Compass cross, a cross of equal vertical and horizontal lengths, concentric with and overlaying a circle.
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter

 

 

 

Glossary:

 


People’s Park Drinking Fountain

Location: Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England

The drinking fountain identified in this blog was located in the People’s Park in Grimsby in the late 19th century and no longer exists. My research uncovered single line references to two drinking fountains within the park; in 1889 a drinking fountain was erected paid for by public subscription; and the erection of a drinking fountain in Grimsby Park on 23 May 1884. Contact made with North East Lincolnshire Council also produced no results.

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Design number 19 was advertised by Walter Macfarlane & Co. to be used as a standalone fountain or placed under a canopy structure. Manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, the 10’ 10” structure was seated on an octagonal plinth. It had a wide base with canted corners supporting a circular shaft ornamented with water lilies. Four lion jambs supported four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. The stanchion and central column were decorated with floral relief and projecting acanthus.

The column contained a shield with a dedication inscription, and four consoles protruding from the column to suspend drinking cups on chains. Two elaborate consoles supported lamps. The capital supported the finial, a statue of Samson.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Lions are symbolic of guardianship and Samson is symbolic of strength.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, an upright bar or post providing support

 


Diamond Jubilee Fountain

Location: Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, Wales

This drinking fountain was installed in 1897 in commemoration of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. It was originally located near the Astoria Cinema in Charles Street. During refurbishment of the cinema, the fountain was relocated and is currently set into a stone pedestal on the walkway to the Town Hall.

The font, casting number 17 (4ft 5 x 2ft 10) from Walter Macfarlane’s catalogue, was manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, Scotland. The design utilizes features of the canopy used in drinking fountain number 8, and is surmounted by a palmette finial. Griffin terminals flank a highly decorated arch outlined with rope and drip fret detail which also encircles a medallion containing a dedication in bas-relief; Erected In The / Sixtieth Year / Of / H.M. / Queen Victoria’s / Reign / 1897. The recessed interior of the arch contains a shell lunette from which a tap once protruded. A single drinking cup on a chain was suspended above a fluted demi-lune basin.

 

Glossary

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Ewing Fountain

Location: Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland

In 1862, Mrs. Catherine Ewing presented the city with an elaborate canopied drinking fountain which was erected in Guildford Square at the corner of Victoria Street. It was flanked on three sides by the Lorne Hotel, the Bute Arms Hotel and the Temperance Hotel.

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I have been unable to find little information on the drinking fountain; whether it was donated as a memorial, or when and why it was removed. My educated guess is that it was removed in the early to mid-1900s most likely due to public awareness of sanitation and possibly dismantled to use the cast iron in war armaments.

Looking to the west

Looking east

The drinking fountain was design number 20, an elaborate 18 feet by 4 feet fountain, sold by Walter Macfarlane & Co, and manufactured at the Saracen Foundry, Possilpark, Glasgow, Scotland. Seated on a two tiered octagonal plinth, the open filigree canopy was supported by eight columns with griffin terminals which were positioned over capitals with foliage frieze above square bases.

The highly decorated cusped arches were trimmed with rope mouldings. Cartouches contained within each lunette offered shields for memorial: swan, crane, and a dedication shield. On each side arch faceplates provided a flat surface for an inscription using raised metal letters; often the useful monition, Keep the pavement dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains.

Doves and flowers offered decorative relief on the circular, ribbed dome. The internal capitals contained flowers and statues of owls on enlarged column heads. The structure was surmounted with a large lantern finial.

Under the canopy stood the font (design number 18.) A circular shaft, ornamented with water lilies, rested on a wide base with canted corners. Four lion jambs supported four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. Rising from the centre was a pyramid shaped stanchion decorated with swan and bird decoration. A kylix-shaped lamp terminal with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions; owls are symbolic of guardians of the afterlife, lions are symbolic of guardianship; and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cusped Arch, the point of intersection of lobed or scalloped forms
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Kylix, a Grecian style drinking cup
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Women Of The Confederacy Fountain

Location: Fayetteville, NC, USA

 

The drinking fountain located in Confederate Park, at the southwest corner of the Lincoln County Courthouse lawn, was dedicated in 1904 as a memorial to the Women Of The Confederacy who worked diligently to keep the home and family safe until the men returned from war.

The fountain originally installed in the northeast corner was moved from its original position within the grounds several times. It was vandalized during the 1960s and both arms were broken.

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On 6 March, 2018 the fountain and statue were transported to the facilities of Robinson Iron in Alexander City, Alabama to be restored as the result of a project initiated in 2015 by the Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC).

The casting seated on a stone plinth was manufactured by J.L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The pedestal contains four panels with alternate space for dedication plaques and small basins supported by decorative consoles. A frieze of rosettes and an egg and dart cornice surround the capital which supports a statue of Hebe, based on the 1806 sculpture by Berthel Thorvaldsen. The daughter of Zeus and Hera, Hebe is the Greek goddess of Youth and Spring, and proffers the cup of immortality at the table of the gods.

The 5’ statue is classically dressed in flowing robes gathered at the waist. Her head is tilted down and to the left and her hair is held by a headband or ribbon. Her left leg is bent and her weight is on her right leg. (This stance is called contrapposto, where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed.) She holds a pitcher with a lowered right hand beside her thigh, and a cup raised in her left hand with her gaze focusing on it. It is believed to be one of the first monuments to women erected in Tennessee.

 

 

The inscription on the fountain states: To The Women Of The Confederacy, Who Kept Intact The Homes Of The South, While The Men Of The South Were Fighting Her Battles, And Who Gave To Their Soldiers, Their Children, And Their Land The Water Of Life, Hope, And Courage, This Fountain Is Erected By Their Grateful Descendants, The Daughters Of The Confederacy.

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From the marker on the lawn: Dedicated By The Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter Of The United Daughters Of The Confederacy In 1904, This Fountain Is A Reminder Of The Honor And Service Of The Confederate Women Of Lincoln County.

flickr-BRENT MOORE

 

Glossary:

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design

The Fountain That Wasn’t A Fountain

Location: Schenectady, New York State, USA

In 1844 at the current intersection of Front, Ferry, and Green Streets, a circular plot of grass was planted with trees and surrounded by a wooden fence to mark the site of a Colonial fort built in 1704.

In 1887 the wooden fence was replaced with an equivalent forged in metal, and a cast iron pedestal was installed surmounted by the statue of an Indian.

The pedestal is essentially a drinking fountain manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The structure is seated on an octagonal stone plinth. It consists of a single pedestal with attic base and canted corners surmounted by a bronze statue of an Indian Chief. Eight arched cornices contain dolphin mascarons, symbolic of guardians of water, designed to spout water into basins.

An attic base supports a short column containing four inset panels bounded by pilasters. Alternating panels display a dedication plaque: Queens New Fort / Built 1705 / Demolished During / The Revolutionary War / This / Memorial Statue / Erected / 12th September 1887.

Two large demi-lune fluted troughs for use by horses usually attached to opposite sides of the pedestal were placed outside the perimeter of the fence. The troughs became obsolete during the advent of the motor vehicle and were removed.

The bronzed statue of an Indian mounted on a cast iron pedestal was purchased as a garden ornament by John Henry Starin, an affluent U.S. congressman who had hundreds of statues on his expansive property in Fultonville. Nicknamed St. Nicholas because of his generosity and philanthropy, Starin donated the statue to the city.

The model of the Indian was originally a wood carving created by Samuel Anderson Robb who was the leading cigar store Indian peddler. It was carved for William Demuth & Co. who cast it in zinc and advertised it in his catalog as “No. 53 Indian Chief.” In 1873, J.L. Mott Iron Works purchased the design and listed it in their catalog of statuary with dimensions of 5ft. 9ins. to the top of the head and 6ft. 6ins. to the top of the feathers. In his right hand the Indian Chief holds an arrow, and in his left hand he holds a bow attached to a base near his left foot, which rests on a rock. (This stance is called contrapposto, where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed.) A tree stump behind his right leg balances the sculpture. He is dressed in a headband containing three feathers standing erect, a bear claw necklace, a cloak, a breechcloth (fabric tucked into a belt that covered the front and back), fringed leggings and moccasins.

In 1898 a plaque was added to the base of the pedestal by the Common Council on the centennial anniversary of the inauguration of the city.

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As part of Schenectady’s tri-centennial celebrations in 1962 the Indian statue was named Lawrence to commemorate a Christian Mohawk who assisted early settlers after the 1690 Massacre. A bronze plaque was attached to the base of the fountain following a parade.

In 1986, the fountain was refurbished, and the head dress and arrow on the statue were replaced. The feathers were incorrectly positioned to the left.

2008 wikimedia daniel case

Status 2009. Creative Commons License, Daniel Case. Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lawrence_the_Indian_statue,_Schenectady,_NY.jpg

Twenty six years later in 2012, a project to restore the structure was administered by the Stockade Association and refinished by Legere Restorations using a blasting method with baking soda. Note that the feathers have been re-aligned to the original position.

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Status 2012.

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, Flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.