Tag Archives: Hebe

Hudson-Fulton Monument

Location: Beacon, New York State, USA

As part of the town’s tribute to the 300th anniversary of the Hudson-Fulton celebration of 1909*, Reverend Thomas Elliott, a retired clergyman, initiated a memorial fund from public donations to purchase a fountain.
(*The 300th anniversary celebration of explorer Henry Hudson’s journey up the Hudson River, and the 100th birthday of inventor and engineer Robert Fulton’s trip on the same river in his steamboat Clermont.)

Installation of the fountain was delayed due to tardy donations and electrical issues (lights were installed on the north and south sides of the memorial to mirror passing vessels which were lit up at dusk.) The unveiling and dedication eventually took place on June 19, 1911 at the location of Bank Square.

A circular granite base incorporated a trough for horses and a smaller trough at ground level for the use of dogs. The cast iron structure seated on a square granite block was manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The bronzed iron pedestal supported a statue of Hebe.

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On alternate sides of the base, there is a lunette containing a lion mascaron within armoria, flanked by acanthus, and an inscription in bas-relief; Hudson-Fulton 1909. The pedestal which repeated the mascaron with fleur de lys, originally supported two consoles bearing globe lanterns. A laurel frieze is situated beneath the cornice.

The capital supports a statue of Hebe, the Greek goddess of youth, classically dressed in flowing robes. Standing contrapposto she holds a pitcher at her right side and a bowl in her raised left hand. The figure was sculpted by Bertel Thorwaldsen.

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Following the advent of the automobile, the need for horse watering troughs declined, and in 1927 the fountain was removed. The statue and pedestal were placed in storage.
Four years later in 1931, the West End Men’s Community Club petitioned for the resurrection of the statue. It was erected facing the river on a triangular plot of land near the southeast corner of Verplanck Avenue and Willow Street which was donated by Mrs. Lewis Tompkins.

Restoration and bronzing of the statue was undertaken by Tallix, Inc. in 2000.

Glossary
• Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
• Armoria, shield, coat of arms, crest
• Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
• Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
• Console, a decorative bracket support element
• Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
• Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
• Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
• Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
• Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
• Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue


Bascom Memorial Drinking Fountain

Location: Prospect Park Troy, NYS, USA

Henry Clay Bascom was a prominent business man, owner of the Vedder Pattern Works, a candidate for Governor of New York State, and a well-known Prohibitionist. His wife, Ellen Lucina Forbes Bascom, was a member and president of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of Lansingburg, New York. She donated a drinking fountain to the City of Troy in memory of her husband, I wish to tender hereby to the city of Troy a memorial to the late H. Clay Bascom to take the form of a drinking fountain for man and beast to be erected in Prospect Park, where I trust its pure and cooling waters may symbolize the principles which were so dear to the one whose memory it will commemorate.”

It was erected in Prospect Park in 1907 south of the Warren mansion on the west side of Prospect Avenue. An engraved dedication on the front of the fountain read: H. Clay Bascom Memorial Fountain, Presented to the City of Troy by Ellen F. Bascom, 1907.

The 15’ 3” tall cast iron structure manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York was seated on a square base. A large fluted demi-lune trough for horses was located at the front of the fountain with a trough for dogs at ground level which was filled with overflow water.

On four sides, there was a lunette containing a lion mascaron within armoria, flanked by acanthus. Two demi-lune basins on opposite sides offered refreshment to humans; and anchored adjacent to the basins were drinking cups suspended on chains. Faucets were operated by pressing metal buttons which released a flow of water over a system of coils encased in ice to provide cool refreshment. A column extending above repeated the mascaron with fleur de lys. A laurel frieze was situated beneath the cornice. (In 1908 a citizen donated two consoles bearing globe lanterns.)

The capital supported a statue of Hebe, the Greek goddess of youth, classically dressed in flowing robes.  Standing contrapposto she held a pitcher at her right side and a bowl in her raised left hand. The figure five feet in height was sculpted by Bertel Thorwaldsen.

Deterioration of the cast iron structure prompted its removal in 1943.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Armoria, shield, coat of arms, crest
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

 

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Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Armoria, shield, coat of arms, crest
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

 


Sterne Memorial Fountain

Location: Jefferson, Texas, USA

Jewish German immigrants Jacob and Ernestine Sterne, prominent leaders of the community, operated the local post office. In 1913 everyone in town attended the dedication of a drinking fountain by Eva Sterne in memory of her parents; “In the gift of this splendid piece of work lay the lifetime of a little immigrant girl grown to womanhood and the gratitude of her children to a little city that had given Mother and Father happiness.” In 1936, the fountain was still being utilized as originally intended; “…for the good of man, stock and dogs, and the pure water that flows through it was given to the Ladies of Jefferson by the late W.B. Ward in appreciation for their work done in the Prohibition Election many years ago.”

The 13½ foot high drinking fountain is located at the intersection of Market & Lafayette Streets, immediately to the south of the Carnegie Library. The fountain, cast by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York, is described for man, horse and dog with a self-closing valve. The structure had an octagonal base which supported two large fluted troughs for horses and two demi-lune basins for humans within rectangular panels. Two small troughs at street level were fed with overflow water for the use of dogs.

A cornice beneath the drinking wells was decorated with palmette motifs. A dedication plaque is mounted above the basin at the front of the fountain. It states: Dedicated / In Honor Of / Jacob And Ernestine / Sterne / Who Lived / In This City / For Many Years / Presented / To The City / Of Jefferson / By Their Children / As An Expression / Of Affection For / Their Native Town.

1913 dedication

A frieze of rosettes sits beneath the upper cornice which is decorated with egg and dart molding. The capital is decorated with alternating acanthus and foliate bas-relief. The terminal is a bronze statue of Hebe designed by Guiseppe Moretti which was copyrighted to J.L. Mott in 1901. Hebe was the daughter of Zeus and Hera, and goddess of Youth and Spring, who offered the cup of immortality at the table of the Gods. This version of Hebe is classically dressed holding a jug in her right hand whilst her other hand rests on her chest.

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In 1982 restoration of the fountain was commissioned by the Marion County Historical Commission. It was re-dedicated and acknowledged with a Texas State Historical Marker erected on the south corner of the intersection which states; Sterne Fountain / Settling In Jefferson Prior To / The Civil War, Jacob And Ernestine / Sterne Became Prominent Leaders / Of The Community. Their Early / Management Of The Post Office / Here And Their Involvement In / Civic And Cultural Activities / Reflected The Dramatic Influence / Jewish Families Had On The / Development Of Jefferson. In 1913 / The Sternes’ Children Gave This / Fountain To The City In Honor Of/ Their Parents. Designed For Use / By People And Animals, It Was / Cast By J. L. Mott Foundry Of / New York. The Work Of Guiseppe / Moretti, It Features A Statue Of / Hebe, The Greek Goddess Of Youth.

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Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Temperance Fountain

Location: La Grande, Oregon, USA

The statue located downtown at the entrance to the park in Max Square, at the corner of 4th St. and Adams Avenue, is an historical bronze reproduction of ‘Cast Iron Mary’, an original Temperance statue which surmounted a drinking fountain.

Dedicated on September 7, 1904, at the intersection of Adams Avenue and Elm Street, the fountain was funded by the town’s chapter of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union to discourage the use of alcoholic beverages in a town that hosted 20 saloons, 6 bordellos, pool halls, gambling facilities, and a brewery.

With the advent of the automobile, the busy commercial intersection of Elm Street and Adams Avenue was paved in 1912, and the fountain was moved to the intersection of Depot and Fourth Streets.

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In 1916 Oregon’s Legislative Assembly prohibited the sale and consumption of alcohol. Although the local brewery, bordellos and saloons closed, alcohol was still peddled in the form of moonshine by bootleggers. On the night of April 22, 1922, George Noble, a local bootlegger, who was fleeing from police, lost control of his automobile and crashed into the fountain. The bootlegger escaped unharmed, but the fountain was toppled and the statue crashed to the ground. Cast Iron Mary was decapitated. The fountain was not replaced due to a decline in its use, and the statue was repaired and sold to the officials of a Texas town.

A fund raising effort to re-erect the statue with a small drinking fountain was initiated as the Cast Iron Mary Project. A concrete pedestal was cast and a replica of the statue created from historical photographs. It was cast in bronze at Valley Bronze and installed at Max Square on 7 August 2003. The bubbler fountain was added in 2004 thus completing the project.

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The original drinking fountain was a casting by J. L. Mott Iron Works and was seated on an octagonal plinth. A single pedestal with canted corners supported two large fluted horse troughs above which were 3 rectangular panels for decoration or dedication. Two demi-lune basins for humans were located at each side within elongated rectangular panels. Drinking cups attached to chains were filled from dolphin mascaron spouts located beneath the cornice. At ground level there were small basins for the use of dogs.

The statue of Hebe holding a jug in her right hand with her left hand on her chest was the casting of a sculpture by Giuseppe Moretti. Although officially named “Temperance,” the town denizens called her “Cast Iron Mary.” She was mounted on an elaborately decorated octagonal base with an engraving W.C.T.U. 1904.

 

Glossary:

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

 


Diehl Fountain

Location: Frederick, Maryland, USA

Miss Marie Diehl, known for her commitment to animal welfare, was a founding member of the Frederick Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, currently known as the Frederick Humane Society.

After Marie’s death in 1907, it was decided to erect a drinking fountain in her honour. Controversy over the best location was resolved when the People’s Fire Insurance Company donated property at the corner of North Court and West Church Streets. The design was selected from J. L. Mott Iron Works catalog by the local branch of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union who donated it to the city. The fountain was formally dedicated to Marie Diehl on August 17, 1911.

The 12-feet high structure was seated on a square base. Two small demi-lune basins were located at ground level for the use of dogs. Four inset panels with highly decorated pilasters displayed an orb surrounded by flourish. On one side was a large trough to accommodate horses, and on the opposite side was a basin for the use of humans. The terminal was a statue of Hebe, classically dressed, holding a pitcher at her right side and a cup in her raised left hand.

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With the advent of the motor vehicle, there was less need for horse troughs and the water fountains were removed. The statue then fell into disrepair and crashed to the ground in November 1947. The entire structure was removed and stored at the City Light Plant on the corner of East Street and East Second Street. When the plant was sold in 1972, the remnants of the statue were recognized and brought to the attention of the Historical Society of Frederick County. The statue, restored by David Mantell, stands on a piece of the original base and is now located in the garden of Steiner House, the headquarters of the Frederick Women’s Civic Club.

BAS-RELIEF

The City of Frederick commissioned Charles C. Crum III to design a fountain for Carroll Creek Linear Park which was officially opened in 2006. Wanting to recognize the City’s history, Crum started work on a design that would highlight the ‘lost’ Marie Diehl drinking fountain. With the original purpose of the fountain uppermost in his mind, he created a fountain for humans and animals using a few remaining pieces of the original fountain.

To highlight the original fountain, a 6 foot tall bas-relief was created by sculptor, Antonio Tobias Mendes, which depicted the fountain and the statue of Hebe as it existed in 1911.

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As a generous benefactor of the project, the Green-walled Garden Club officially opened the fountain with the City of Frederick on 19 July 2007. A dedication plaque is positioned above the fountain.

Diehl Memorial Fountain

The Original Memorial, Unveiled On August 17, 1911 / Was Dedicated To The Humane Efforts Of Marie Diehl (1855-1907) / A Founder Of The Frederick Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To Animals / Now The Frederick Humane Society.

The 12-Foot Tall Monument Depicted Hebe, The Greek Goddess / Of Youth And Spring, And Featured Drinking Fountains “For Man And Beast.” / In Addition To A Fountain For People, There Was A Large Basin For Horses / And Two On The Sides For Dogs And Cats.

The Bas-Relief Here Portrays The Original Memorial Where It Stood / At The Corner Of Church And Court Streets. And, In That Monument’s Tradition / These Fountains Are “To Furnish Refreshing Drink” To The Citizens Of Frederick / And Their Beloved Animals.

Glossary:

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Rebecca at the Well Fountain

Location: Block Island, Rhode Island

Following a convention in 1874, local chapters of the National Woman’s Christian Temperance Union were encouraged to erect drinking fountains as an alternative to men quenching their thirst in saloons. The W.C.T.U. chapter on Block Island chose a drinking fountain surmounted by a statue of Rebecca at the Well from the J. W. Fiske Iron Works catalog. It was erected in 1896 at the intersection of Water Street, Ocean Avenue, Pilot Hill Road and Spring Street.

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A square base seated on an octagonal plinth, this structure contains four small basins at each corner for the use of dogs. A dedication plaque is located between two cornices, Erected By The W.C.T.U. / Of / Block Island, Rhode Island / July 22, 1896.

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Four side panels are decorated with cusped arches. Horse troughs with floral design are offered on two panels, a fluted basin for human consumption, and the fourth panel contains a decorative design with shield and mascaron. The capital, edged with rope detail and acanthus frieze, states For God And Home And Every Land.

A classical statue of Rebecca at the Well with a grape garland in her hair is situated on an abacus. She cradles an urn tipped at an angle.

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The statue has been mistakenly identified as Hebe, possibly because the W.C.T.U. used Hebe on many of their drinking fountains as she was associated with diluting wine with water. However, the statue of Hebe carries a pitcher in one hand and holds a cup in the other. The statue on Block Island is most definitely Rebecca at the Well.

Deterioration of the structure from weather, and damage as the result of motor vehicles, left the fountain in need of restoration. Having received confirmation of a federal grant to replace the Rebecca statue she was removed from the drinking fountain in April 2001 and transported to Conservation Technology Corp. in Newport. Although restoration was planned, after inspection it was decided that the zinc and iron statue, which had deteriorated due to weather erosion, would not have the structural integrity required to withstand continued exposure to the outside elements.

The statue was stripped and a plaster mold made to create a replica casting in aluminium alloy. In December 2001, the replica was set on its newly restored base at the traffic circle where High, Spring and Water streets intersect. Whereas the original statue of Rebecca faced Water Street at the ferry entrance, the ‘new’ statue was erected facing the opposite direction. It was formally dedicated with a ribbon cutting ceremony on 7 June 2002.

The original statue which had been repaired and restored remained in a workshop for many years until funding from the Champlin Foundation allowed work to proceed on the West Gallery of the Block Island Historical Society. Rebecca at the Well moved to her new home at the West Gallery in 2014.

Glossary:

  • Abacus, at the top of a capital, a thick rectangular slab of stone that serves as the flat, broad surface
  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Cusped Arch, the point of intersection of two ornamental arcs or curves, such as the inner points of a trefoil
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.