Tag Archives: Hebe

Hamilton’s Hebe Fountain

Location: Hamilton, Ohio, USA

Following the completion of a public water supply system by the City of Hamilton in 1884, First National Bank donated a drinking fountain to the city in 1890. It was located near the main entrance of the bank in the Shuler and Benninghofen block on High Street.

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Used with permission. Source: Lane Public Libraries’ Cummins Photo Collection

The two images shown below at the northeast corner of Third and High Streets show the Shuler and Benninghofen block decorated for the 1891 centennial. Note that there are only forty-four stars in the hanging flag. Click to see larger image.

The Great Flood of 1913 covering more than four-fifths of Hamilton was Ohio’s largest weather disaster, and was the most wide-spread disaster in the history of the United States. Within the city the storm dropped between 4-8 inches of rain in 4 days. The fountain which is approximately 11’ 8” high is barely visible at the right edge of the image below.

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Used with permission. Lane Public Libraries’ Cummins Photo Collection

In 1929 the drinking fountain was removed to enable construction of the new First National Bank building, and for the next 47 years, it stood in the yard of a private residence on Haldimand Avenue on Hamilton’s West Side.

First National Bank re-acquired the fountain in 1975 and discussions between the bank and the Butler County Historical Society generated a plan to restore the fountain. Hamilton Foundry recast broken and missing pieces, and a Cincinnati sculptor was retained to clean, refinish and reassemble the fountain. It was reinstalled at its original location in front of the bank at Third and High Streets in 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial observance.

In 2012, the bank now renamed First Financial Bank entered into an agreement with the city to demolish an older building at the intersection of Martin Luther King Boulevard and High Street to create a small park and relocate the fountain there in exchange for a city-owned parking area off Market Street.

When the structure was moved the maker’s plate, J.L. Mott N.Y., originally located at the front face of the capital beneath the statue, was attached to the rear of the structure where an additional plaque reads, Restored 1975 by Hamilton Foundry and First National Bank.

The fountain was manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The structure is seated on an octagonal stone plinth. It consists of a single pedestal with attic base and canted corners surmounted by a 5’ bronze statue. An inscription on the base of the statue states: Manufactured by J.L. Mott Iron Works/ Cor. Beekman & Cliff St, New York.

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Used with permission, Jacob Stone

Eight arched cornices contain dolphin masks which were symbolic of guardians of water. The fountain supplied refreshment to humans via a dolphin mascaron which spouted water into a demi-lune fluted basin facing the sidewalk. A drinking cup was suspended on a chain.

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Horses drank from a large circular fluted trough facing the street from which overflow water fed two smaller basins for the refreshment of smaller animals. A plaque located above the horse trough is inscribed; First National Bank.

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Used with permission, Jacob Stone

An attic base supports a short column containing 4 inset panels bound by pilasters. The panels offered bas-relief with the option of a dedication plaque.

The capital supports a statue of Hebe, a Greek goddess, based on the 1806 sculpture by Berthel Thorvaldsen. The daughter of Zeus and Hera, Hebe is the Greek goddess of Youth and Spring, and proffers the cup of immortality at the table of the gods. The statue is classically dressed in flowing robes gathered at the waist. Her head is tilted down and to the left, and her hair is held by a headband or ribbon. Her left leg is bent and her weight is on her right leg. (This stance is called contrapposto, where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed.) She gazes at a raised cup in her left hand while holding a pitcher beside her right thigh.

In acknowledgment, I would like to thank Jacob Stone from City Hall who furnished me with several images from the Lane Public Libraries’ Cummins Photo Collection in addition to taking a current status photograph. His prompt, generous and willing assistance is to be commended. https://www.facebook.com/HamiltonOH/

The City of Hamilton is a sculptural hot-spot featuring in excess of fifty public sculptures around the downtown area with an equal number just a short distance away at Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park. Hamilton is located at the southern end of the Great Miami Riverway in southwest Ohio.

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
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Women Of The Confederacy Fountain

Location: Fayetteville, NC, USA

 

The drinking fountain located in Confederate Park, at the southwest corner of the Lincoln County Courthouse lawn, was dedicated in 1904 as a memorial to the Women Of The Confederacy who worked diligently to keep the home and family safe until the men returned from war.

The fountain originally installed in the northeast corner was moved from its original position within the grounds several times. It was vandalized during the 1960s and both arms were broken.

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On 6 March, 2018 the fountain and statue were transported to the facilities of Robinson Iron in Alexander City, Alabama to be restored as the result of a project initiated in 2015 by the Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC).

The casting seated on a stone plinth was manufactured by J.L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The pedestal contains four panels with alternate space for dedication plaques and small basins supported by decorative consoles. A frieze of rosettes and an egg and dart cornice surround the capital which supports a statue of Hebe, based on the 1806 sculpture by Berthel Thorvaldsen. The daughter of Zeus and Hera, Hebe is the Greek goddess of Youth and Spring, and proffers the cup of immortality at the table of the gods.

The 5’ statue is classically dressed in flowing robes gathered at the waist. Her head is tilted down and to the left and her hair is held by a headband or ribbon. Her left leg is bent and her weight is on her right leg. (This stance is called contrapposto, where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed.) She holds a pitcher with a lowered right hand beside her thigh, and a cup raised in her left hand with her gaze focusing on it. It is believed to be one of the first monuments to women erected in Tennessee.

 

 

The inscription on the fountain states: To The Women Of The Confederacy, Who Kept Intact The Homes Of The South, While The Men Of The South Were Fighting Her Battles, And Who Gave To Their Soldiers, Their Children, And Their Land The Water Of Life, Hope, And Courage, This Fountain Is Erected By Their Grateful Descendants, The Daughters Of The Confederacy.

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From the marker on the lawn: Dedicated By The Zollicoffer-Fulton Chapter Of The United Daughters Of The Confederacy In 1904, This Fountain Is A Reminder Of The Honor And Service Of The Confederate Women Of Lincoln County.

flickr-BRENT MOORE

 

Glossary:

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design

Starkweather Fountain

Location: Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA

When water mains were installed in the city of Ypsilanti in 1889, Mrs. Mary Ann (Newberry) Starkweather donated an elaborate drinking fountain which was erected on the southeast corner of Huron & Congress outside the Ypsilanti Savings Bank (now City Hall).

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Source: Ypsilanti Historical Society

The 12ft. 6ins. tall fountain manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York was seated on an octagonal granite plinth. The base consisted of a single octagonal pedestal with attic base and canted corners.

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Eight arched cornices contained dolphin mascarons which are symbolic of guardians of water. On the east and west sides, mascarons spouted water into demi-lune basins for human consumption. Drinking cups were suspended by chains. Horses drank from two large demi-lune fluted troughs on the north and south sides. Overflow water fed basins at ground level for the refreshment of small animals. A plaque between the dog troughs was inscribed with the maker’s name, The J.L. Mott/Iron Wks. N.Y.

An attic base supported a short square column containing 4 inset panels bounded by pilasters. Within the panels, 3 cartouches contained bas-relief and a fourth cartouche offered an engraved plaque. The capital supported a five feet tall bronze statue of a Greek goddess standing contrapposto. The figure of Hebe classically dressed in flowing robes was sculpted by Bertel Thorvaldsen. She is the daughter of Zeus and Hera, the goddess of Youth and Spring, and cup bearer of the Gods. She gazes at the cup of immortality as she raises it with her left hand. A jug is held with a lowered right hand beside her thigh.

In April 1932 the fountain was dismantled for repair, with the intention of placing it in the park behind Ladies Library. However, it was put into storage (possibly due to a new awareness of sanitation). In 1935, the short column and statue were detached from the fountain structure, and erected at the entrance to Tourist Park on Catherine Street.

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There are numerous unsubstantiated tales regarding the fate of the separated fountain base and statue which have been lost for decades. One of the most likely is the requisition and destruction of ornamental iron decorations as raw material for the war industries.

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests

 


Hudson-Fulton Monument

Location: Beacon, New York State, USA

As part of the town’s tribute to the 300th anniversary of the Hudson-Fulton celebration of 1909*, Reverend Thomas Elliott, a retired clergyman, initiated a memorial fund from public donations to purchase a fountain.
(*The 300th anniversary celebration of explorer Henry Hudson’s journey up the Hudson River, and the 100th birthday of inventor and engineer Robert Fulton’s trip on the same river in his steamboat Clermont.)

Installation of the fountain was delayed due to tardy donations and electrical issues (lights were installed on the north and south sides of the memorial to mirror passing vessels which were lit up at dusk.) The unveiling and dedication eventually took place on June 19, 1911 at the location of Bank Square.

A circular granite base incorporated a trough for horses and a smaller trough at ground level for the use of dogs. The cast iron structure seated on a square granite block was manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The bronzed iron pedestal supported a statue of Hebe.

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On alternate sides of the base, there is a lunette containing a lion mascaron within armoria, flanked by acanthus, and an inscription in bas-relief; Hudson-Fulton 1909. The pedestal which repeated the mascaron with fleur de lys, originally supported two consoles bearing globe lanterns. A laurel frieze is situated beneath the cornice.

The capital supports a statue of Hebe, the Greek goddess of youth, classically dressed in flowing robes. Standing contrapposto she holds a pitcher at her right side and a bowl in her raised left hand. The figure was sculpted by Bertel Thorwaldsen.

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Following the advent of the automobile, the need for horse watering troughs declined, and in 1927 the fountain was removed. The statue and pedestal were placed in storage.
Four years later in 1931, the West End Men’s Community Club petitioned for the resurrection of the statue. It was erected facing the river on a triangular plot of land near the southeast corner of Verplanck Avenue and Willow Street which was donated by Mrs. Lewis Tompkins.

Restoration and bronzing of the statue was undertaken by Tallix, Inc. in 2000.

Glossary
• Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
• Armoria, shield, coat of arms, crest
• Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
• Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
• Console, a decorative bracket support element
• Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
• Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
• Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
• Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
• Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
• Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue


Bascom Memorial Drinking Fountain

Location: Prospect Park Troy, NYS, USA

Henry Clay Bascom was a prominent business man, owner of the Vedder Pattern Works, a candidate for Governor of New York State, and a well-known Prohibitionist. His wife, Ellen Lucina Forbes Bascom, was a member and president of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of Lansingburg, New York. She donated a drinking fountain to the City of Troy in memory of her husband, I wish to tender hereby to the city of Troy a memorial to the late H. Clay Bascom to take the form of a drinking fountain for man and beast to be erected in Prospect Park, where I trust its pure and cooling waters may symbolize the principles which were so dear to the one whose memory it will commemorate.”

It was erected in Prospect Park in 1907 south of the Warren mansion on the west side of Prospect Avenue. An engraved dedication on the front of the fountain read: H. Clay Bascom Memorial Fountain, Presented to the City of Troy by Ellen F. Bascom, 1907.

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Circa 1910

The 15’ 3” tall cast iron structure manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York was seated on a square base. A large fluted demi-lune trough for horses was located at the front of the fountain with a trough for dogs at ground level which was filled with overflow water.

On four sides, there was a lunette containing a lion mascaron within armoria, flanked by acanthus. Two demi-lune basins on opposite sides offered refreshment to humans; and anchored adjacent to the basins were drinking cups suspended on chains. Faucets were operated by pressing metal buttons which released a flow of water over a system of coils encased in ice to provide cool refreshment. A column extending above repeated the mascaron with fleur de lys. A laurel frieze was situated beneath the cornice. (In 1908 a citizen donated two consoles bearing globe lanterns.)

The capital supported a statue of Hebe, the Greek goddess of youth, classically dressed in flowing robes.  Standing contrapposto she held a pitcher at her right side and a bowl in her raised left hand. The figure five feet in height was sculpted by Bertel Thorwaldsen.

Deterioration of the cast iron structure prompted its removal in 1943.

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Armoria, shield, coat of arms, crest
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

 

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Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Armoria, shield, coat of arms, crest
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

 


Sterne Memorial Fountain

Location: Jefferson, Texas, USA

Jewish German immigrants Jacob and Ernestine Sterne, prominent leaders of the community, operated the local post office. In 1913 everyone in town attended the dedication of a drinking fountain by Eva Sterne in memory of her parents; “In the gift of this splendid piece of work lay the lifetime of a little immigrant girl grown to womanhood and the gratitude of her children to a little city that had given Mother and Father happiness.” In 1936, the fountain was still being utilized as originally intended; “…for the good of man, stock and dogs, and the pure water that flows through it was given to the Ladies of Jefferson by the late W.B. Ward in appreciation for their work done in the Prohibition Election many years ago.”

The 13½ foot high drinking fountain is located at the intersection of Market & Lafayette Streets, immediately to the south of the Carnegie Library. The fountain, cast by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York, is described for man, horse and dog with a self-closing valve. The structure had an octagonal base which supported two large fluted troughs for horses with decorative shields to protect the float valve and ball cock from damage by horses. Two demi-lune basins for humans were set within rectangular panels. Two small troughs at street level were fed with overflow water for the use of dogs.

A cornice beneath the drinking wells was decorated with palmette motifs. A dedication plaque is mounted above the basin at the front of the fountain. It states: Dedicated / In Honor Of / Jacob And Ernestine / Sterne / Who Lived / In This City / For Many Years / Presented / To The City / Of Jefferson / By Their Children / As An Expression / Of Affection For / Their Native Town.

1913 dedication

A frieze of rosettes sits beneath the upper cornice which is decorated with egg and dart molding. The capital is decorated with alternating acanthus and foliate bas-relief. The terminal is a bronze statue of Hebe designed by Guiseppe Moretti which was copyrighted to J.L. Mott in 1901. Hebe was the daughter of Zeus and Hera, and goddess of Youth and Spring, who offered the cup of immortality at the table of the Gods. This version of Hebe is classically dressed holding a jug in her right hand whilst her other hand rests on her chest.

In 1982 restoration of the fountain was commissioned by the Marion County Historical Commission. It was re-dedicated and acknowledged with a Texas State Historical Marker erected on the south corner of the intersection which states; Sterne Fountain / Settling In Jefferson Prior To / The Civil War, Jacob And Ernestine / Sterne Became Prominent Leaders / Of The Community. Their Early / Management Of The Post Office / Here And Their Involvement In / Civic And Cultural Activities / Reflected The Dramatic Influence / Jewish Families Had On The / Development Of Jefferson. In 1913 / The Sternes’ Children Gave This / Fountain To The City In Honor Of/ Their Parents. Designed For Use / By People And Animals, It Was / Cast By J. L. Mott Foundry Of / New York. The Work Of Guiseppe / Moretti, It Features A Statue Of / Hebe, The Greek Goddess Of Youth.

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Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Temperance Fountain

Location: La Grande, Oregon, USA

The statue located downtown at the entrance to the park in Max Square, at the corner of 4th St. and Adams Avenue, is an historical bronze reproduction of ‘Cast Iron Mary’, an original Temperance statue which surmounted a drinking fountain.

Dedicated on September 7, 1904, at the intersection of Adams Avenue and Elm Street, the fountain was funded by the town’s chapter of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union to discourage the use of alcoholic beverages in a town that hosted 20 saloons, 6 bordellos, pool halls, gambling facilities, and a brewery.

With the advent of the automobile, the busy commercial intersection of Elm Street and Adams Avenue was paved in 1910, and the fountain was moved to the intersection of Depot and Fourth Streets.

 

In 1916 Oregon’s Legislative Assembly prohibited the sale and consumption of alcohol. Although the local brewery, bordellos and saloons closed, alcohol was still peddled in the form of moonshine by bootleggers. On the night of April 22, 1922, George Noble, a local bootlegger, who was fleeing from police, lost control of his automobile and crashed into the fountain. The bootlegger escaped unharmed, but the fountain was toppled and the statue crashed to the ground. Cast Iron Mary was decapitated. The fountain was not replaced due to a decline in its use, and the statue was repaired and sold to the officials of a Texas town.

A fund raising effort to re-erect the statue with a small drinking fountain was initiated as the Cast Iron Mary Project. A concrete pedestal was cast and a replica of the statue created from historical photographs. It was cast in bronze at Valley Bronze and installed at Max Square on 7 August 2003. The bubbler fountain was added in 2004 thus completing the project.

The original drinking fountain was a casting by J. L. Mott Iron Works and was seated on an octagonal plinth. A single pedestal with canted corners supported two large fluted horse troughs with decorative shields to protect the float valve and ball cock from damage by horses. Two demi-lune basins for humans were located at each side within elongated rectangular panels. Drinking cups attached to chains were filled from dolphin mascaron spouts located beneath the cornice. At ground level there were small basins for the use of dogs

The statue of Hebe holding a jug in her right hand with her left hand on her chest was the casting of a sculpture by Giuseppe Moretti. Although officially named “Temperance,” the town denizens called her “Cast Iron Mary.” She was mounted on an elaborately decorated octagonal base with an engraving W.C.T.U. 1904.

Glossary:

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.