Tag Archives: People’s Park

Richard Russell Fountain

Location: Limerick, Munster, Ireland

Officially opened in 1877 the People’s Park was given to the people of Limerick in honour of Richard Russell, a prominent local businessman and highly regarded employer. A drinking fountain provided by employees of Russell Flour Mills and the former Carnegie Library was also unveiled at the same time.

In 2009 Limerick City Council and Limerick Civic Trust decided to restore the fountain as it had fallen into disrepair. The project was undertaken by Eura Conservation Ltd. funded by Limerick City Council, the Earl of Limerick Fund, the People’s Park Trustee Fund, Civic Trust resources and conservation money. The fountain was dismantled and shipped to England where it was blasted, cleaned, repaired and a paint analysis was done. Missing parts were recreated using moulds from a restoration of the same fountain design in Belfast which was also restored by Eura. After repainting the structure was weatherproofed.

It was returned to Limerick in November 2009. The fountain adorned with lights to illuminate the structure was rededicated by the mayor of Limerick, Kevin Kelly.

Drinking fountain number 2 is seated on an octagonal plinth and consists of eight columns supporting a large solid domed canopy. The open filigree frieze above the cornice is expanded to the interior of the dome, and the outer edge of the cornice is decorated with Maltese crosses. The ribs on the domed roof are outlined with stars or suns. The cupola trimmed with a rope design is surmounted with a weathervane finial identifying the four compass directions.

The wide based font, design number 13, was located on a raised and stepped platform. The central pedestal was supported by four columns stamped with a diamond pattern. Square capitals on each side of the dog toothed basin contain a seven pointed embellishment which may represent a star or the sun. This symbol also outlines the ribs on the domed roof. Four consoles with acanthus relief connect the central stanchion to the basin and originally supported drinking cups suspended on chains. Shell motif spouts released water flow. A multi-tiered circular column was surmounted by a studded orb terminal.

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Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Consoles, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Dog toothed
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Adair Fountain, People’s Park

In 1860 a proposal was made to create a People’s Park, and the land surrounding the mill pond at Todd’s Hill in Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland was donated by Sir Robert Alexander Shafto Adair Bt. (Baronet) for this purpose. Ten years later the project was completed.

In 1909, a drinking fountain, positioned just inside the gates on the avenue, was presented to the people of Ballymena by Sir Frederick Edward Shafto Adair Bt. It was cast by the Musgrave Foundry of Belfast.

Seated on a circular plinth the highly decorated, circular pedestal supports a quatrefoil basin. Four fluted columns bear four lunettes framed by an arch which also offered hooks from which cups were suspended by chains. On three sides the cartouche contains a dolphin. Dolphins, considered guardians of all things water related, are also found in the capitals. The fourth cartouche contains a dedication shield: Presented to the people of Ballymena by Sir Frederick Adair, Bart 1909. An acroter is banded by a sculptured shell frieze and cornice below the fish scale dome. The structure is surmounted by a finial.

The fountain was designated an historic building in 1987. Restoration of the park was undertaken in 1997, and restoration of the drinking fountain was completed in 2001.

Glossary

  • Acroter, a flat base
  • Capital, The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, A structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
  • Cornice, A molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Finial, A sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted Shaft, A long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, The horizontal part of a classical entablature just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Lunette, The half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Plinth, Flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, A type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter

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Sources:
http://www.ballymena.gov.uk/seventowers/peoplesparkhistory.asp

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2386137

http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/built-home/recording/historic_buildings_r/buildings_database.htm


Victoria Drinking Fountain

Location: Dun Laoghaire, County Dublin, Ireland

Located in the People’s Park on Marine Road it is known as the Victoria Fountain, erected to commemorate the visit of Queen Victoria to Dublin in 1900. She disembarked at the harbour in Kingstown (now renamed Dun Laoghaire.)

In 1981 the fountain was almost destroyed by the Republicans, but four years later it was restored to working order and illuminated. The following year the fountain was rededicated to mark the 70th anniversary of the 1916 Rising, and an inscribed stone paving slab was laid beside it.

The most current restoration of the fountain was completed using patterns from the original manufacturer which are owned by Heritage Engineering and Restoration. This Scottish firm recreated the cast iron filigree dome, and completed a paint analysis to discover the original colour of the structure. In the final stages of restoration, a water supply was provided and the structure was lit using fibre optics. The project, funded by the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company, was completed in 2002.

The canopied drinking fountain is design number 20, an elaborate 18 feet by 4 feet fountain, sold by Walter Macfarlane & Co, and manufactured at the Saracen Foundry, Possilpark, Glasgow, Scotland. Seated on a double octagonal plinth, the open filigree canopy is supported by eight columns with griffin terminals which are positioned over capitals with foliage frieze above square bases.

The highly decorated cusped arches are trimmed with rope mouldings. Cartouches contained within each lunette offer shields for memorial.

  • Inscription: Restored by Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company 2002
  • Inscription: Erected to commemorate the visit of Her Majesty Queen Victoria April 1900
  • Two shields display a crane standing on one leg
  • Two shields display a swan in water
  • One shield has an engraved head of Queen Victoria wearing a crown, and another shield with the head of a man wearing a crown.

On each side arch faceplates provide a flat surface for inscription using raised metal letters; often the useful monition, Keep the pavement dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains.

Doves and flowers offer decorative relief on the circular, ribbed dome. The internal capitals contain flowers, statues of owls on enlarged column heads, and lion mascarons on internal shields. An imperial crown finial is at the apex.

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 18.) A circular shaft, ornamented with water lilies, rests on a wide base with canted corners. Four lion jambs support four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. Rising from the centre is a pyramid shaped stanchion decorated with swan and bird decoration. The terminal is a winged horse originally with four consoles that offered drinking cups suspended by chains.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions; cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance, lions are symbolic of guardianship, owls are symbolic of guardians of the afterlife, and the winged horse’s connection with water derives from the myth that everywhere Pegasus struck his hoof to the earth, an inspiring spring burst forth.

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Glossary

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription.
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cusped Arch, the point of intersection of lobed or scalloped forms
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Imperial crown, a crown encrusted with jewels surmounted with a pattée cross
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal