Tag Archives: Victoria

Parker Memorial Fountain

Location: Daylesford, Victoria, Australia

The drinking fountain/horse trough currently located at Vincent Street and Central Springs Road near the old post office is a replica of a 19th century structure originally erected at Burke Square at the intersection of Vincent and Albert Streets.

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Source: Facebook/DaylesfordHepburnoldphotos

The fountain was donated to the town by Mr. George W. Parker, Mayor of the Borough, in commemoration of his year of office. It was obtained through Messrs. John Dank & Son, Melbourne, and delivered by ship from England. The 15 feet high structure was formally presented on 17 June 1891.

In 1914 complaints were made by carters due to a lack of water flow which was not enough to allow horses to drink. It was discovered that this issue was caused when several teams of horses drank in succession. A ball tap was installed to correct the problem.

The following year in March, the maintenance crew reported that the taps in the fountain at Burke Square were constantly being broken by children. An additional health issue of the cups hanging in the horse troughs resulted in the cups being removed. It is unknown when the drinking fountain itself was removed.

As part of the Daylesford Streetscape Revitalisation Project in 2012, a replica of the historical horse trough was installed at its original location in Burke Square.

The original drinking fountain was design #27 manufactured by Walter Macfarlane & Co. in the Saracen Foundry, Glasgow. The design was advertised as well suited for Street Crossings, Squares, Market Places, etc., as it afforded drinking accommodation for a large number of horses and drivers, and effectively lit a wide space, with the least possible obstruction to other traffic.

It provided a drinking trough for horses with small basins for dogs at ground level. The trough was a 6’6” diameter circular cast iron basin supported on legs in the form of horses’ hooves. The water was regulated by a small patent cistern, which was self-acting, and when the troughs were full the ball rose and shut the water off.

The central stanchion supported a central column with flared bases and pilasters. Four projecting consoles suspended cups on chains that allowed humans to drink from spouting water (the water flow was operated with two bib valves which released water when pressed). Horses drank from the large basin.

A dedication shield located directly above the consoles was adhered to the fluted shaft. The decorative capital, enriched with acanthus and rosette with a dog tooth frieze, supported a central gas lamp roofed in with scales of opal glass which allowed the lantern to cast the light downward. The terminal was a crown.

walking melbourne 

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Dog tooth, pyramid shaped carving
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, Flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Stanchion, an upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Market Square Fountain

Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

At the main gate to the Market Square stands the historic drinking fountain originally located at Five Corners. Joseph Heywood who owned 5 acres of property at this location installed a drinking fountain/horse trough there in 1885 to quench the thirst of tired horses hauling loads from rural Saanich to Victoria. It was replaced with another fountain in 1937 by Maurice Humber to celebrate the city’s 75th anniversary.

An informative plaque on the structure details its history.
Market Square Main Gate Fountain
This Historic Fountain Was Originally Erected Near The Turn Of The / Century At ‘The Edge Of Town’ Known As The Five Corners / Government Douglas Gorge And Hillside Streets / The Three Level Fountain Provided Water For Parched Travellers / And Their Thirsty Horses, As Well As Smaller Animals Such As Dogs / And Pigs On Their Way To Market/ The Fountain Was Removed To The City Work Yards In 1950 Where / It Languished Until It Was Restored When These Nine Heritage / Buildings Were Refurbished In 1975 To Create Market Square.

Seated on a square plinth is a single pedestal with attic base containing a small demi-lune basin on two sides for the use of dogs. Two large demi-lune fluted horse troughs located above supplied the dog basins with overflow water. The front of the fountain has an extended arm supporting a basin for human use. A panel with bas-relief displays the figure of a classically robed woman holding a cup. Egg and dart moulding sits below the cornice.

Glossary:

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Egg and dart, a carving of alternating oval shapes and dart or arrow shapes
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

Wilkinson Memorial Drinking Fountain

Location: Williamstown, Victoria, Australia

Reverend George Wilkinson. a native of County Cork, and described as a perfectionist, was the first rector of the prefabricated iron Holy Trinity Church, Williamstown. The temperance movement was a powerful religious, political and social force in Victorian society and he was held in awe for his denunciation of the evils of drink.

The cast-iron drinking fountain manufactured by the Saracen Company fountain is located at the corner of Nelson Place & Syme Street, Commonwealth Reserve, Williamstown, and was erected in 1876 by public subscription to commemorate the Reverend who had died a year earlier. The Wilkinson Memorial Drinking Fountain is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register Number H1733.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue stands on a bluestone plinth made by monumental mason, Harry Bliss. The structure is 9 feet 6 inches high and consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals unite with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches contained within each lunette host the image of a crane, and an inscription which reads, Wilkinson Memorial Drinking Fountain 1875. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome, the finial being a crown with a pattée cross.

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The basin which has a scalloped edge and decorative relief is supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The terminal (a crane) was removed with the original copper cups about 1935 when it was converted to a bubbler. The fountain currently has two stainless steel taps.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Belcher Drinking Fountain

This drinking fountain, like so many others of the period, is a testament to the Temperance Movement that advocated the restriction of alcoholic drinks. It was created by the Britannia Ironworks of Andrew Handyside in Derby, England. The design was ordered from a catalogue, design number 48 on page 40 of the 1879 publication.

The cylindrical structure with attic base is seated on a triple circular plinth and surrounded by four Corinthian columns. The highly decorative volutes support a cupola with Neptune frieze and a cornice with leaf detail. The finial is a putto holding an urn on his shoulder and at the apex is a lamp. The font is an unusual form resembling a capped urn with lion masks spouting water.

The fountain was presented to the town of Geelong by Mayor G. F. Belcher at the end of his term in 1874 and was located at the junction of Malop Street and Gheringhap Street in Geelong, Victoria, Australia. After the introduction of trams, it was relocated to Johnstone Park, and then returned to its original site after the tram line closed in 1956.

In 1974 it was rededicated to celebrate the centenary of the Fountain; and was restored as part of Geelong’s sesquicentenary (150 years) foundation celebrations in 1988.

The Belcher Drinking Fountain is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register Number H1116. The Register lists places of cultural heritage significance to the State of Victoria, and provides legal protection against demolition or other alterations to listed sites.

Glossary

  • Attic base, A column base with two rings
  • Corinthian,
  • Cornice, A molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Cupola, A small, domed structure on top of a roof
  • Finial, A sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Frieze, The horizontal part of a classical entablature just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Putto, A figure in a work of art depicted as a chubby male child, usually nude
  • Volute, a spiral scroll-like ornament found in the capital of a column

Sources:

http://vhd.heritage.vic.gov.au/#detail_places;1933

http://friargatebridge.blogspot.ca/2011/04/belcher-drinking-fountain-in-geelong.html


Thomas Henderson Drinking Fountain

Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Thomas Henderson donated a drinking fountain to the city of Melbourne at the end of his term as Mayor It was shipped from the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, Scotland and erected in 1877. It originally stood outside North Melbourne Post Office (in the Town of Hotham) and currently resides outside the Town Hall at Errol Street and Queensbury Street in North Melbourne.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane’s catalogue is 9 feet 6 inches high and was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow. The structure consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals unite with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches contained within each lunette host the image of a crane, and on two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep the pavement dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome, the finial being a crown with extended spike (terminal #231).

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The basin which has a scalloped edge and decorative relief is supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offer drinking cups suspended by chains. The original design was offered with the statuette of a crane, but as modifications and embellishments were accommodated, it was replaced with a kangaroo.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

The history of the fountain includes several different locations and modifications to the structure itself including the installation of a pedestal style basin with a drinking spout. A photograph from 1970 held by Picture Victoria shows two shields containing the Coat of Arms for the town of Hotham. A dedication would almost certainly have been in one of the remaining shields, and a modern equivalent was installed during the fountain’s restoration in 2001. Thomas Henderson, namesake of the patron, was in attendance during the ceremony.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal