Category Archives: Glenfield & Kennedy

Aberlour Railway Station Drinking Fountain

Location: Aberlour, Moray, Scotland

The drinking fountain attached to the wall of the main building served travellers for many years following the opening of the railway station in 1923. The Strathspey Railway closed the line to passengers in 1965 although freight traffic continued to use it until 1971. The building has now been transformed by the Aberlour Community Association and serves as a visitor centre and tearoom.

The redundant water fountain set into the wall of the former Aberlour Station building is model D17 cast by the Kennedy Patent Water Meter Co. Ltd. of Kilmarnock, Scotland, now known as Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd.  The maker’s name is stamped onto the backplate; T. Kennedy Patentee / Kilmarnock.

The cast iron backplate has straight sides with moulded arches at the top and bottom of the structure. A bas-relief inscription requests patrons to Keep The Pavement Dry (civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains). A central push button released water from a shell motif spigot into a fluted demi-lune basin. A galvanized cup, originally suspended by a chain, captured drinking water from patented self-closing taps.

Glossary

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid
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Top Green Park Fountain

Location: Coventry, England

The drinking fountain located on the eastern side of Top Green near Warwick Road was donated to the community by Mayoress Alick Sergeant Hill.

Designed and manufactured by Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. this late 19th century design is known as Kennedy’s patent, self closing, anti-freezing Pillar fountain. It consists of a short fluted shaft with a fluted domed cap and a missing small moulded finial resembling a pineapple. An attached plaque is embossed with the legend; A Gift By Mrs Alick S Hill Mayoress Of Coventry 1916-1918.

Water which was released by turning a decorative knob located directly above a lion mascaron spout was captured in a tin cup suspended on a chain from the domed top. A small demi-lune trough at ground level captured overflow water for the use of dogs.

Glossary:

  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

 


Killowen Drinking Fountain

Location: Coleraine, Londonderry, Northern Ireland

In the mid part of the 19th century, homes in the Waterside area of Coleraine had no water supply. The drilling of a small diameter well in 1870 delivered spring water from 80 feet below the surface of Captain Street Lower. The fountain was most likely erected at the edge of the pavement around this time period. It was believed that the water held special powers and was delivered to the sick and dying.

geograph_albert bridge

Creative Commons License, Albert Bridge. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2825813

On ordnance survey maps of Coleraine, the fountain is indicated by the letter ‘P’ (for pump) in 1882; by WT (water trough) in 1904, 1922 and 1949; and as a pump in 1973 and subsequent years.

irish news

The Historic Buildings Unit of the DOE recorded the drinking fountain as a Category B+ listing on 22 March 2016, and in the spring of 2017 it was announced that the drinking fountain, which is still in operation and used daily by locals, will be restored.

geograph_albert bridge2

Creative Commons License, Albert Bridge. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2825836

Design L34 by Glenfield Company Limited offers a square pedestal with geometric pattern on the base. All four sides have a panel edged with cable fret; the panel on the east side has a lion mascaron with a large circular flower or sun motif and a central button that activates the release of water. The manufacturer’s name is engraved below the mascaron; Glenfield Co. / Limited / Kilmarnock. A studded cornice beneath the capital supports a square base with nail head moulding surmounted with an urn finial (the original design offered a lamp post).

Glossary

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Nail head molding, a series of low four-sided pyramids
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Saavedra Fountain

Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

This wall drinking fountain is model D17 cast by the Kennedy Patent Water Meter Co. Ltd. of Kilmarnock, Scotland, now known as Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. It is inset to the wall of the Luis Maria Saavedra railway station in the Northern end of Buenos Aires. It was installed in 1891 when the station opened.

Buenos_flickr_marzilius

The cast iron backplate has straight sides with arches at the top and bottom of the structure. A central push button released water from a shell motif spigot into a fluted demi-lune basin. A galvanized cup, originally suspended by a chain, captured drinking water from patented self-closing taps.

The fountain hosts several bas-relief inscriptions;

  • Keep The Pavement Dry (civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains);
  • FCCA; an acronym for Ferrocarril Central Argentino translated as Central Argentina Railway.
  • Kennedy Patentee;
  • Kilmarnock.

This model is also located on the Alton Railway Station Platform in Hampshire, England.

Alton_flickr_rusty marvin

Used with permission. Photographer: http://johnworacker.com

Alton_flickr_paul busby

Used with permission, Paul Busby. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/busb/3353597652/

Glossary

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid

 


The Fountains of Whitehaven

Location: Whitehaven, Cumbria, England

On 12 May 1859, Mrs. Bateman Wilson, wife of the chairman of the Water Committee, formally received a cup of water from the first drinking fountain erected in Whitehaven. Located in the centre of Green Market it served many involved in the sale and purchase of market goods. The fountain was cast iron painted dark green with griffin mascarons. A jet of fresh glacial water from Ennerdale Lake spouted from the mouth of a mascaron, and was captured in one of two drinking vessels, a white shell patterned ladle suspended by a chain.

To provide the public with fresh sanitary drinking water, a fountain was also erected at Sugar Tongue Quay to slake the thirst of longshoremen who unloaded sugar from West Indies. It was removed in 1899. Three additional fountains were erected adjoining the old churchyard of St. Nicholas at Queen Street, at the intersection of Church Street and George Street, and at Albion Street near the foundry in Newtown.

Bransty Arch

Bransty Arch

The fountain inset to the wall of Bransty Arch was removed in 1925. Two years later the arches which had become an obstacle to bus transportation were also removed.

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The fountain on Lowther Street (Flatt Walks) near the entrance to Castle Park is identical to the wall inset fountain that graced the Bransty Arch. Cast iron detail is representative of Glenfield & Kennedy’s iron foundry in Glasgow. The fountain supplied water from the mouth of a lion mascaron which was then captured in a demi-lune fluted basin. A similar basin at ground level for the use of dogs was sheltered by an upturned fluted basin. The centre of the fountain contains the date 1859, a shield displaying the Lowther Coat of Arms (also incorporated into the town of Whitehaven’s crest) and the name of the town WHITEHAVEN.

Drinking fountain on wall of Bransty Arch

Drinking fountain on wall of Bransty Arch

As part of Whitehaven’s regeneration and the Quest Art Trail Project, the fountain was restored in 1997 with the addition of a modern sculpture created by John McKenna which represents a miner stepping out of the wall with a whippet at his feet.

Creative Commons License, Julian Osley. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4047576

Creative Commons License, Julian Osley. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4047576

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On Tangier Street, a stone drinking fountain with horse trough was erected outside the Cumberland Motor Services (CMS) bus station. It was commissioned in memory of Robert Fisher, one of Lord Lowther’s horse trainers, and manager of the Whitehaven cab company. Two iron spigots which protruded from the pedestal allowed humans to drink and filled the trough with water.

Cumberland Motor Services bus station

Cumberland Motor Services bus station

CMS bus station on Tangier Street

CMS bus station on Tangier Street

The structure was moved to Castle Park in the 1970s. The structure with fish scale domed roof which stood in the center of an octagonal horse trough was originally surmounted with a two globe lamppost. Bas-relief on one of the octagonal panels is the left facing profile of a horse’s head within scrollwork, and a second panel with bas-relief contains a left facing profile of a horse’s head within a circle. A third panel contains a commemorative inscription: This / Fountain Was / Erected By / The Friends Of / Robert Fisher / Who Died / 1st February 1911 / Aged 87 Years / As A Memorial / Of The High / Esteem In Which / He Was Held / As A Genial / Townsman & A / Fine Sportsman / Who Was Devoted / To Horses.

Memorial to Robert Fisher

Memorial to Robert Fisher

Castle Park

Castle Park

Also on Tangier Street, an identical fountain/horse trough terminating in a lamp terminal was erected outside the Grand Hotel on Tangier Street

5-grand hotel_whitehaventimes 5

Glossary:

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • pedestal
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Overtoun Drinking Well

Location: Overtoun, Greenock, Inverclyde, Scotland

Within the moorland of Inverclyde is the Greenock Cut, a narrow aqueduct channelling water from the hills into the city. At the east end of the aqueduct at Overtoun, the cut passes under a bridge. On the west side is a cast iron drinking fountain and two plaques which commemorate the centenary of the cut created in 1827.

The fountain was cast by Glenfield and Kennedy of Kilmarnock. It consists of a single pedestal with a fluted demi-lune basin. The scroll backplate was embellished with floral bas-relief and a lion mascaron. Above the lion mask a circle held the inscription of the foundry, Glenfield Kennedy Limited Kilmarnock. A medallion with rope moulding contained a central push button which released water from the lion mask. A drinking cup was originally suspended by a chain.

Glossary:

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mask/Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Medallion, a circular device bearing a portrait or relief moulding
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Laird Fountain

The Tranmere Abbatoir in Birkenhead was opened by Mayor William Laird Esq. in 1886. To commemorate the opening of the abbatoir, a fountain was mounted into the wall at the corner of New Chester Road and the entrance to Cammell Laird Shipyard.

The fountain is cast iron coated with copper which has weathered to create a blue/green patina. It is surmounted by a terracotta canopy with attic base and fluted conical acroteria.

The cast iron backplate is in the form of a stylized shield with decorative relief. The scalloped base (originally a trough for dogs) is flanked by two lion masks which delivered water to the trough. A single pedestal supports a protruding basin above which is a panel containing a large lion mask from which water spouted. A wreath and the date 7th March is displayed above the mask.

The top third of the fountain contains a ribbon scroll displayed across the width of the backplate with a dedication; These Abattoirs Were Opened By Wm Laird Esq J.P. Mayor Of Birkenhead.

Four rosettes which flank the backplate were possibly used to conceal bolts that anchor the plate to the bricks. On the wall to the right of the basin there is a circular plate with a button and the inscription; T. Kennedy Patented Kilmarnock. Thomas Kennedy was a partner in the firm Glenfield Co. Ltd. of Kilmarnock, manufacturers of castings and general foundry work.

The fountain was listed a Grade II historic building in 2011.

Glossary

  • Acroteria, an ornament placed on a flat base and mounted at the apex of the pediment
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings

 

Image Sources

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/630889

http://www.liverpoolmonuments.co.uk/drinking/birkenhead01.html

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12547928@N07/5384635229/