Thank you for visiting my blog.  As of 2019 the database is approaching 400 posts identifying cast iron drinking fountains located around the world. To search for a specific item use the Search Box by entering a relevant detail e.g. city, memorial name, etc. The blog can also be searched using the Category Box which offers a search by country, foundry, historic registers, etc.

Continue reading

Max Wagner Fountain

Location: Nantucket, MA, USA

The drinking fountain located at Max Wagner Square was anonymously donated to the town in 1885 and installed at the top of Main Street. In 1893 at the same time as the street lighting was installed it was relocated to bottom of the Main Street in Town Square and disconnected from the water main. The cobblestones which pave the street were brought to the island as ballast in ships.

books_nantucket

The square and the drinking fountain were dedicated in 1932 to the memory of Lieutenant Max Wagner, who lost his life in the Spanish-American War. Born in 1866 in Charleston, South Carolina he moved to Nantucket and married Jennie Macy, a descendant of the very first of the English founding families on Nantucket. When the Spanish-American War broke out in 1898, Wagner already a U. S. Army veteran re-enlisted, serving first in Puerto Rico and then in the Philippines where he was killed in 1900.

A sign mounted on the lamp pillar identifies Lieut. Max Wagner Sq. U.S.W.V.

The drinking fountain is unique in that it has not been removed, as so many others around the country were, to improve flow of traffic. Vehicles on Main Street are directed around the structure which the Nantucket Garden Club maintains with seasonal flowers and greens.

The drinking fountain/horse trough is identified as design #3 for man and beast in Henry F. Jenks’ foundry catalog. The 24 feet high structure manufactured in cast iron consists of a solid base with an annular channel for use as a dog trough.

HF Jenks #5

A pedestal with attic base hosts arched panels for dedication or bas-relief enrichment. A movable panel in one side offered access to plumbing. A circular horse trough standing 4 feet 3 inches above ground level was a comfortable height for horses to drink and had the capacity to hold a barrel of water (42 gallons).

The centre of the basin contains a jamb from which dolphin mascarons spouted water and drinking cups were attached. Waste water was directed to the dog trough at street level. This design prevented contagious distemper.

The fountain was provided with self closing faucets and the pipes within were constructed to resist freezing in cold temperatures. Fountains were supplied both with and without an ice box attachment as desired. An ice box was placed near the sidewalk underground, which was provided with coils of tin lined pipe on which ice was placed to cool the water flowing through the coils to the outlet of the fountain.

The fluted lamp pillar originally terminating in a gas lantern now hosts an electric bulb.

Glossary:

  • Annular; circular, ring shaped
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Newton Stewart Fountain

Location: Newton Stewart, Dumfries & Galloway, Wigtownshire, Scotland

This ‘lost’ fountain once stood at Dashwood Square in front of McMillan Hall which housed the municipal offices, old Town Hall. It was featured in the town seal used in the 1980s.

The combination cast iron lamppost and fountain remained in situ until the advent of the motor vehicle rendered it obsolete. It was removed to improve the flow of traffic in the late 1940s.

The fountain seated on a circular plinth was a design by George Smith manufactured at the Sun Foundry in Glasgow. The round base supported a large drinking basin for horses and offered a trough for small animals at ground level. A multi-tiered central column which extended into a lamp pillar was flanked by two putti holding upturned urns from which water poured. The figurines advertised as Boy with Paddle and Urn stood on a short pedestal that contained a button to release a flow of water from the urns.

When it was scrapped post-war, the two ‘boys with paddles’ were rescued by the mother of the curator of the local museum and found a home in the Public Gardens.

Sun #8_Putto paddle

Images below kindly submitted by John P. Bolton, The Scottish Ironwork Foundation.

newton-stewart-2008-05-df

Glossary:

  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Putto (plural Putti), a figure in a work of art depicted as a chubby male child, usually nude.

Lion Mascaron Pillar Fountains

Designed and manufactured by Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. this late 19th century design was advertised as Kennedy’s patent, self-closing, anti-freezing pillar fountain. It consists of a fluted cast iron cylindrical column with moulded domed cap and small finial resembling a pineapple.

Water was drawn from a well by a wind pump and delivered by gravity from a reservoir. The water which was released by turning a decorative knob was located directly above a lion mascaron spout. It was captured in a tin cup suspended on a chain from the domed top. A small demi-lune trough at ground level captured overflow water for the use of dogs. Some models used a lever on the side to release the water and had an integral bucket platform located just above the base of the column.

Capture

Clifton-on-Teme, Hereford & Worcester, England. Manufacturer’s stamp on the base, Glenfield Coy Ltd.

ENG_clifton

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. The instruction, Turn the Handle is redundant as the handle is missing. A legend beneath the lion mascaron states, Waste Not Want Not.

ENG_Shrewsbury

Ticknall, South Derbyshire, England. Located east of Hayes Farmhouse. It was erected 1914 at the behest of Sir Vauncey Harpur-Crewe of Calke Abbey. Bucket platform & lever are visible.

ENG_Ticknall_images of england

Washinborough, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. Located on the High Street this model contains an integral bucket platform. The manufacturer’s stamp is located beneath the lion mascaron, Glenfield & Kennedy Co. Kilmarnock.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Source: Flickr/Alan Saxman

Port Stanley, Falkland Islands. Manufacturer’s name is visible on the rear.

JPB_falkland

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by R Williams

Kelso, Scottish Borders, Scotland. Currently located at Ednam House Hotel.

JPB_kelso

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Kilmun, Argyll & Bute, Scotland. Located within the church graveyard it is a unique example with the original cup and chain. A spigot projects from the lion’s mouth.

Midlem, Scottish Borders, Scotland. 

JPB_Midlem

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Peebles, Scottish Borders, Scotland. 

JPB_Peebles

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Stirling, Scotland. Dog trough at base. The manufacturer’s name is located on the column within the trough.

JPB_Stirling

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Stromness, Orkney Islands, Scotland. This model contains an integral bucket platform and a modern tap.

JPB_Stromness

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Moniaive, Dumfries& Galloway, Scotland. Located at the base of steps leading to a gated entrance to Glencairn Church Graveyard. Painted white with a lever on the side.

JPN_Moniaive

Source: Scottish Ironwork Foundation. Photo by John P. Bolton

Killala, Co. Mayo, Ireland. Located at Seaview Terrace, the manufacturer’s stamp is visible beneath the lion mascaron, Glenfield & Kennedy Co. Kilmarnock

DIGITAL CAMERA

Source: Flickr/JohnnyG

Glossary:

  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

Dog’s Mouth Fountain

Location: Roanoke, Virginia, USA

In 1884 approval was given to build a market in Roanoke. The first building completed in 1886 formed the core around which the Curb Market and Market Square developed. A drinking fountain for man, horse and beast which was installed in 1898 still exists at the corner of Salem Avenue and Market Street and is used by police horses. Legend states that whoever drinks from the fountain will always return to Roanoke.

Design #12 was manufactured by J.L. Mott Iron Works of New York. The structure is a highly decorated circular pillar with decorative relief in the form of fruit and flora. A lion mascaron spouts water into a small basin for use by humans, and a tin cup was originally affixed with a chain. On the street side a larger basin was used by horses to quench their thirst. Two bowls at the base of the pedestal provided water for smaller animals. The structure terminates in a pineapple finial which is symbolic of hospitality.

Glossary:

  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Mask/Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Relief, a sculptural technique to give the impression that the sculpted material has been raised above the background

 


Wallasey Drinking Fountains

Location: Wallasey, Merseyside, England

Harrison Park which was presented to the Town in 1896 by the Harrison family in memory of their parents is home to a unique cast iron drinking fountain. Manufactured by the Scottish firm of Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. it was restored during regeneration of the park in 2003.

The pillar fountain advertised as model D34 has a square base with a Greek geometric design often associated with Alexander Thomson. Four panels edged with rope frieze contain lion mascarons and a sun/flower orb. One of the panels identifies the manufacturer; Glenfield & / Kennedy / Limited / Kilmarnock.

Four basins with scalloped edge are located beneath the lion heads which spout water. Drinking water was originally captured in tin cups and overflow water fell into the basin and was directed to small troughs at ground level for the use of animals. The capital supports a base with dog tooth frieze surmounted by a putto blowing a horn with a stylized dolphin resting at his feet. A new casting of this statue was created as part of the fountain’s restoration.

 

A second drinking fountain was located at the Pier Head tram terminus in New Brighton. Design number 19 was manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow. Seated on an octagonal plinth, it had a wide base with canted corners supporting a circular shaft ornamented with water lilies. Four lion jambs supported four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. The stanchion and central column were decorated with floral relief and projecting acanthus.

The lamp pillar contained four protruding consoles which suspended drinking cups on chains. The column terminated in an elaborate design featuring two lanterns. Symbolism was popular in Victorian times and lions were symbolic of guardianship.


Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Putto, a figure in a work of art depicted as a chubby male child, usually nude
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, an upright bar or post providing support

Three Donkeys Fountain

Location: Ouchy, Switzerland

Although not a cast iron drinking fountain I couldn’t resist sharing the background story of this fountain situated in a popular lakeside resort south of the centre of Lausanne at the edge of Lake Geneva. The fountain was erected near the pier of the CGN (Compagnie Générale de Navigation) in recognition of the donkeys’ contribution to the history of the city of Lausanne.

At the beginning of the 19th century, blocks of stone and sand unloaded at the port of Ouchy were transported by donkeys and pack mules along a steep and rocky road to the outskirts of the city. As they journeyed to their destination, the local people exclaimed, in mocking reference to the professors who travelled the same route to the Lausanne Academy, “Here! Here is the Ouchy Academy!” An engraving on the structure reflects this legend, En Souvenir De L’academie D’ouchy (In memory of the Academy of Ouchy).

The drinking fountain is in the form of a large trough from which three donkeys drink. The bronze sculpture was created by Edouard Marcel Sandoz, a Swiss sculptor. It was inaugurated on June 2, 1937.

The laborious service of the donkeys ended in 1877 with the installation of a railway line between Ouchy and Lausanne.


‘Old Ish’ Drinking Fountain

Location: Ishpeming, Michigan, USA

On the corner of Main Street and Cleveland Avenue stands a structure which is more famous for the statue of an Indian than for its original purpose as a drinking fountain for humans and horses. Fund raising efforts by the Vice President of a local mining company (the area is rich in iron ore) successfully erected the drinking fountain in 1884.

Manufactured by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York the structure was originally seated on an octagonal stone plinth. It consists of a single pedestal with canted corners surmounted by a bronze statue of an Indian Chief.

0-views to-ish-094

Used with permission. Source: http://viewsofthepast.com/

The fountain supplied water to horses and humans via dolphin mascarons (symbolic of guardians of water) located within eight arched cornices. Two of the mascarons spouted water into small basins for human consumption which were supported by scroll consoles. Drinking cups were suspended by chains. Horses drank from a large circular fluted trough from which overflow water fed four small basins on each corner for the refreshment of smaller animals.

A plaque mounted on the base of the structure by the Marquette County Historical Society reads: “Old ‘Ish / Erected In 1884 Through The Efforts / Of C.H. Hall Of The Lake Superior / Mining Company – Ishpeming. Made By / The J.L. Mott Company – New York. / Originally It Was Painted Black / And Had Three Drinking Fountains / For Humans, Horses & Dogs.”

Above the arches an attic base supports a short column containing four inset panels with bas-relief bound by pilasters. The capital provides the foundation for the bronze statue known as Old Ish. The sculpture was modelled from an original wood carving created by Samuel Anderson Robb who was the leading cigar store Indian peddler. It was carved for William Demuth & Co. who cast it in zinc and advertised it in his catalog as “No. 53 Indian Chief.” In 1873, the J.L. Mott Iron Works purchased the design and listed it in their catalog of statuary.

In his right hand the Indian Chief originally held an arrow, and in his left hand he holds a bow attached to a base near his left foot which rests on a rock. This stance is called contrapposto, where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed. A tree stump behind his right leg balances the sculpture. He is dressed in a headband containing three feathers, a bear claw necklace, a cloak, a breechcloth (fabric tucked into a belt that covered the front and back), fringed leggings and moccasins. A maker’s plate is situated on the base of the statue indicating J.L. Mott Iron Works, N.Y.

Several original features of the fountain and statue are missing. The dolphin masks no longer exist, the horse trough has been removed, and the arrow is missing from the Indian’s right hand. The direction of the statue has also changed. It is unclear whether this occurred during a documented prank or if it was incorrectly re-installed when the statue was removed in 1985 to allow cracks in the cast iron base to be repaired. Originally the horse trough was on the left of the statue and the two small basins were in front and behind the statue as seen in the last image.

2-1950s

Circa 1950s. Dolphin masks, horse trough and arrow are missing

1-flickr

Image used with permission, Norm Powell. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/napowell/29639532323/

3-views to-ish-027

The arrow is visible in right hand. Image used with permission. Source: http://viewsofthepast.com/

3-roadarch2

The arrow missing from right hand. Source: http://www.roadarch.com/giants/indians2.html

4-views to-ish-051

This image shows the original orientation and features that are now missing. Image used with permission. Source: http://viewsofthepast.com/

During my research I discovered a blog that delves into the history and haunting of Ishpeming related to an Indian burial ground. Review it here

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Contrapposto, stance where one leg bears the weight and the other leg is relaxed
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mask/Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.