Beaumaris Castle Drinking Fountain

Location: Beamaris, Isle of Anglesey, Wales

The drinking fountain is located between Beaumaris Castle and the Happy Valley Pavilion. It was erected on 23rd June 1893 in the public pleasure grounds adjoining Beaumaris Castle by Alderman Thomas Hughes who later became Mayor.

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain seated on an octagonal plinth is design #14 manufactured by George Smith & Co., Sun Foundry, Glasgow. The ogee shaped base and acroter support a single pillar with attic base and inset arched panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola with alternate panels of fleur de lys motif. The structure is surmounted with an acorn shaped finial.

Originally, two demilune basins with a chain for a suspended cup offered water to humans, and at ground level was a basin for dogs.

geograph

Creative Commons License. Source: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3716217

A plaque is inscribed with the legend; Presented / To The / Corporation / Of / Beaumaris / By Alderman / Thos. Hughes / 1893

flickr_wendy-harris

Used with permission, Wendy Harris. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pefkosmad/7468567498/

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

Phoenix Park Fountains

Location: Cowcaddens, Glasgow, Scotland

In the late 19th century and early 20th century there were two fountains in Phoenix Park on Garscube Road. The large ornamental spray fountain was commissioned and donated by a local confectioner and owner of John Buchanan & Bros. Ltd. known as John ‘Sweetie’ Buchanan. It was manufactured by Edington Foundry also known as the Phoenix Foundry (the park was established on the site previously occupied by the foundry.) The park was restored in 1959 and the derelict (due to neglect) spray fountain was demolished.

The smaller drinking fountain, known as the well was also located within the park not far from the spray fountain. Design #25 was manufactured by James Allan Senr & Son, Elmbank Foundry, Glasgow.

The 7ft. 2ins. high structure had a single fluted pedestal with a band of acanthus relief was seated on a two tiered circular stone plinth. A large basin sculptured with egg and dart relief supported 4 dwarf Corinthian columns with attic base. The capitals supported 4 arches decorated with a bas-relief of laurel leaves and a solid dome ornamented with fish scale design. The terminal was an urn with orb finial. A constant stream of water operated via a self-closing tap was delivered through a single jet centrally placed within the canopy. Two drinking cups were suspended from chains.

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1955-hiddenglasgow

Circa 1955

The area surrounding and including the park was cleared during the building of the M8 in the 1970’s.

Glossary

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Canopy, an ornamental roof-like projection
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Column Corinthian, a fluted shaft with flowers and leaves at the capital.
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 

Edward Denis De Vitre Memorial Fountain

Location: Lancaster, England

Edward Denis De Vitre was a philanthropist with incredible community spirit. In 1840 he was Chairman of the Lancaster Gas Company. However, he is most famous as a doctor who in 1842 was a consulting physician at Lancaster Asylum and was a great proponent for the cause of the mentally afflicted. He became one of the founders of Royal Albert Asylum for Idiots and Imbeciles of the Northern Counties.

He was elected Mayor in 1843 and again in1855. In 1845 he was also active in the committee of the Lancaster Canal, and by 1853 he was Director of West Hartlepool Harbour and Railway Company. He was a Justice of the Peace for the Borough and County of Lancaster, and in 1864 he was elected President of the Lancashire and Cheshire Branch of the British Medical Association. It is not difficult to imagine why a large procession accompanied his coffin to the Lancaster Cemetery in 1878.

A drinking fountain and lamp was erected in his memory in 1880 outside the old town hall in Market Street. The structure was seated on a large square plinth bordered by four cast iron guard posts, and bore an inscription: Presented To The Shareholders Of The Lancaster Gas Company 1880 In Memory Of Edward Denis De Vitre , M.D., 40 Years Chairman Of The Company

It was relocated some time before 1903 per photographic evidence and installed in Queen’s Square near King Street until 1942 when it was permanently removed. An obstacle to motor traffic is the most likely reason for its removal, in addition to public awareness of water sanitation.

The fountain was design number 194 registered to George Smith & Co. manufactured by the Sun Foundry of Glasgow. The original structure was 17 feet 2 inches high. The pedestal with chamfered edge hosted four panels containing a lion mascaron with self-closing tap from which water spouted into demi-lune basins. Drinking water was captured in metal cups suspended on chains. Overflow water drained into small troughs at ground level for dogs.

A frieze of acanthus leaves was situated beneath the capital upon which there was a lamp standard with a base of four decorative scrolls. The pedestal had a bulbous base with bas-relief extending into a fluted column with bands. A two tiered acroter supported decorative yoke maintenance arms and a tapered hexagon glass lantern.

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Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfer, a beveled edge
  • Compass cross, a cross of equal vertical and horizontal lengths, concentric with and overlaying a circle.
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of a street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder

 

Emanuel Emanuel Memorial Drinking Fountain

Location: Portsmouth, Hampshire, England

Called an officious little Jew by the Hampshire Telegraph in 1849 during a period of latent antisemitism, Alderman Emanual Emanuel was a leading force in reforming the town of Portsmouth. Although he refused to take the mandatory Christian oath of office, his focus nonetheless was a fearless spokesman for the advancement of the community. He was a leading force in many important projects i.e. securing water and gas supplies, promoting the railway to London, securing land for Victoria Park (now known as the People’s Park), creating piers and construction of the Esplanade. He became the first Jewish Mayor of Portsmouth in 1849.

He died in 1888 and was celebrated with a huge public funeral. His children donated a memorial drinking fountain to the Portsmouth Corporation five years later. It was erected at South Parade where it remained from 1893 to 1934. When it became an obstacle to motor traffic, the structure was relocated to the western end of the Canoe Lake. The Fountain was restored in 1962, 1991 and 2005, and was recorded as a Grade: II listed building on March 18th, 1999.

The Fountain is design #126 manufactured by the Coalbrookdale Company in Shropshire. The structure is seated on a square plinth with canted corners. A granite base supports the rounded polished granite pedestal bearing the 5ft 4ins high bronze figure of Temperentia by John Bell. The pedestal offers two taps for drinking which originally contained cups suspended on chains. The bronze statue with wings close to the body has her head lowered as she watches a dove seated on her right hand drink from a water-lily in her left hand.

An inscription on the back of the base reads: In Memory Of Emanuel Emanuel, Alderman, J.P. / Who Was Mayor Of Portsmouth 1866-67 / This Fountain Was Given To The People Of Portsmouth / By His Son And Daughter / Barrow Emanuel And Lady Magnus / Aldn. R. Barnes, Mayor 1893.

A cast iron canopy over the drinking fountain is supported by four columns; the base of each is gilded with the letters CBD (Coalbrookdale). The columns are sculpted in the form of a vine; internal and external capitals are gilded water lilies with acorn finials (originally these finials were four glazed lanterns). The vines connect in an arch on each of the four sides, and above each arch are intersecting vines and water-lilies.

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Glossary

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.