Category Archives: Trough

Columbus Man and Beast Fountain

Location: Columbus, Georgia, USA

In 1890, a contract between the Water Works Company and the city included provision of an ornamental fountain to be placed in front of the courthouse (this fountain is now located at Fourth Street and Broadway.) Three other Victorian fountains situated along Broadway clarify the adopted name of Fountain City.

Design #14 by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York has a circular base with a trough for dogs at street level and a short bulbous pedestal decorated with flora. The cornice, decorated with acanthus frieze, sits beneath the capital which supports a finial resembling an urn surmounted with globe. A lion mascaron spouts water into a fluted basin designed for human use. A large trough for horses is located on the opposite side.

A historic marker furnished with details is located on site; Fit For Man And Beast / This watering fountain at Broadway and 10th / Street represents the last one of several located / in each block down Broadway. It is Columbus’ / oldest public fountain, dating back to the earliest / days of the city. Called the Man and Beast / fountain. It contains three watering bowls, one / at street level for dogs, a large one in the middle / for horses, and a medium-sized one near the top / for people. Although we no longer go to public / fountains to collect drinking water, fountains / offer our community an identity and sense of / history in our public spaces. / Erected By / Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc. / Historic Chattahoochee Commission / 2008

hmdb marker

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

Pedestal

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Brattleboro Drinking Fountain/Horse Trough

Location: Brattleboro, Vermont, USA

A cast iron drinking fountain for the use of man and beast was erected on the corner of Main Street and High Street in July 1872. It was located near the old oak tree in the hope that the water source would discourage the consumption of beer and alcohol. In 1875 complaints that there was little water flow may have been the reason that its usage declined.

Photographic evidence reveals that the fountain was still in place in 1907. The date when it was replaced with a fire hydrant is unknown as is the fate of the fountain.

The manufacturer of the cast iron octagonal pedestal fountain which offered a supply of drinking water to humans, horses and smaller animals is unknown. Inset arched panels and rosettes decorated the pedestal. A fluted, recessed, demi-lune basin with a cup suspended on a chain offered a drinking receptacle for humans. On the opposite side a fluted trough was offered for the refreshment of horses. Water flowed from lion mascarons into the horse trough and the small fluted demi-lune basin situated at ground level for the convenience of dogs.

same model

This fountain in San Francisco is the same model but manufacturer is unknown

Glossary:

  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design

 


Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee Horse Trough and Lamp Standard

Location: Longford, Tasmania

To celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee, a lamp was erected on 23 June 1887 in front of Mr. Whitfield’s dispensary on the corner of Wellington and Marlborough Streets in Longford. Mr. Whitfield subsequently donated ornamental fixtures for the electric light in 1911.

Longford2

In 1896, Mr. J. Smale secured public subscriptions to erect a fountain at the site of the Jubilee lamp to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The structure was manufactured by Bogle & Clark Engineers for Longford Water Trust. The circular cast iron basin was 2 ft. 6 in high and 4ft 6 in in diameter with a depth of 10ins. It was supported by a central fluted column and four legs in the form of horses’ hooves. The column rising from the basin supported the lamp. Yoke maintenance arms were positioned beneath the lantern.

The structure having been built to accommodate cattle was no match for the arrival of the motor car. In May 1924, a resident backed his car into it with such force that the fountain was dislodged and the lamp-post broken. Five years later in 1929 the drinking fountain was again repaired after being badly damaged in a collision only to suffer the same fate in 1939 when another motor vehicle collided with it in the early hours of the morning. It was moved 10 feet by the impact and badly damaged. At that time, it was decided to disconnect the water supply to prevent cows from gathering to drink as a separate water source was available for cattle a short distance away.

The trough was restored in 1988 by Glasgow Engineering (previously known as Bogle & Clark) as part of Australia’s bicentennial celebrations. It is located in the area known as Heritage Corner.

Glossary

  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of the street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder

 


Quebec City Fountains

Location: Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

Quebec City, with the air of an old European city, is a UNESCO world heritage site. A favourite tourist attraction is the guided horse-drawn carriage ride through the Historic District of Old Quebec. There are several drinking fountain/horse troughs throughout the city to accommodate these working beasts that can drink 49 litres of water per day.

These structures were manufactured by Henry F. Jenks of Pawtucket, R.I. and stand on an octagonal plinth. A fluted circular moulding creates a trough at ground level for the use of dogs. The fluted pedestal with attic base rising from the center of the trough hosts two arched panels for dedication; the coat of arms of Quebec City is represented by a ship in full sail which signifies Quebec’s importance as a seaport, and the full sails symbolize strength and courage.

The capital which supports a large basin 56 inches in diameter capable of holding 100 gallons, is decorated with bas-relief fret. It is 4 feet 3 inches above ground level. A central jamb hosts bas-relief including 4 dolphins that spout water into the basin with the overflow falling to the trough below. The pipes within the fountain were constructed to resist freezing in cold temperatures. The finial is highly decorated with floriated relief and a studded band terminating in a globe with the same detail as the basin.

Glossary:

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

Metuchen Fountain and Horse Trough

Location: Metuchen, NJ, USA

In the early years of the 20th century a triangle of land at the Intersection of Oak and Middlesex Avenues was donated by Metuchen Building and Loan to house a public drinking fountain/horse trough. Following fundraising efforts, which included ball games and minstrel shows, the fountain was purchased by the Woodwild Park Association, and was erected in 1903 at the edge of the road where it was accessible to horses.

With the advent of the motor vehicle it became a traffic obstacle and was moved back from the edge of the road where it currently remains. The structure is maintained by members of the Woodwild Park Association and was restored in the 1980s. In 2016, an evaluation of the structure revealed substantial corrosion resulting in the removal of the fountain to Alexander City, Alabama where it will be restored by the restoration company, Robinson Iron.

gmnews_removal

Casting number 50 manufactured by J.L. Mott Iron Works consists of a square base with four inset panels supporting a central column with additional panels. A fluted demi-lune trough for watering horses is located on one side, and there was originally a smaller basin at ground level for dogs. On the opposite side a basin supported by console was available for people. The cornice beneath the capital is decorated with a frieze of acanthus. A large capped urn is seated on a three tiered acroter.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings

Jubilee Fountain and Trough

Location: West Linton, Scottish Borders, Scotland

The horse trough and Jubilee lamp located at the area of Bogsbank Road and Station Road known as church corner was originally erected at Raemartin Square. West Linton considered to be the biggest market in Scotland probably had need of a drinking fountain for cattle and their drovers.

The horse trough was design #12 manufactured by Walter Macfarlane’s Saracen Foundry in Glasgow. The structure is 6 feet 4 inches tall and the cast iron basin is 5 feet in diameter. The fluted central pedestal originally offered two drinking cups suspended on chains from two consoles. The structure which is supported by four horse hooves is capped with an acorn finial. A shield on the pedestal is inscribed; Broomlee Band Of Mercy / Erected / In Commemoration Of / Queen Victoria’s / Diamond Jubilee / June 1897 / Be Merciful / After / Thy Power

The lamppost accompanying the trough is design #146, and although this example stands as a separate form it was often offered as the central pedestal within the trough.

Glossary

  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


Man and Beast Fountain

Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

In the late 19th century, Mrs. Anna L. Moering approached the City of Cambridge with the proposal to donate a drinking fountain designed by H. F. Jenks, of Providence, Rhode Island. It was offered to provide clean drinking water to animals during the summer heat in Quincy Square (the triangular space between Massachusetts Avenue, and Harvard Street behind Lamont Library).

Although the City disagreed with the proposed location, an identical model of the offered fountain was erected on Quincy Street near Broadway.

cambridge 23 jul 1881

Cambridge Chronicle, 23 July 1881

The 24 feet high fountain manufactured in cast iron consisted of a solid base with a circular channel for use as a dog trough. A pedestal 4ft high supported a horse trough, 56 inches in diameter, in the form of a basin (at 4 feet 3 inches above ground level it was a comfortable height for horses to drink with ease) with the capacity to hold a barrel of water (100 gallons). At the base of the post, water flowed into the basin from miniature lion mascarons and dispensed into the trough at ground level. This design prevented contagious distemper. The waterways through the fountain were constructed so that they would not become clogged nor become frozen in cold temperatures. The centre of the bowl contained an ornamental post with a gas lantern.

A patent was applied for this design in 1880 by H. F. Jenks with the following description;
The design contemplates supplying water for man and beast; and to this end, as a feature of utility, I provide a capacious basin for animals to drink from, and a trickling stream, from which, in a cup, a portion may be caught for human use. An annular channel in the base permits dogs and birds to drink from.

The characteristic feature in the appearance of this design is a cylindrical pedestal mounted upon a suitable base, and supporting a circular bowl, nearly hemispherical in configuration, from the center of which springs a vertical tapering stem, bearing near its base two or more dolphins or mythical aquatic creatures, represented with streams of water issuing from their mouths and falling into the bowl. This bowl is so formed and located upon the pedestal that when approached by a team the pole will pass beneath the bottom of the said bowl, so as to allow the horses on both sides of the pole to drink at the same time without any loss of time or necessity for unhitching or driving up one side at a time, as usual, to water.

The stem may be continued upwardly, ornamented, as shown, with leaves, flutes, etc., and may support a lamp or lantern, if desired, in any suitable form, or basket for plants.

In the base and surrounding the pedestal is an upturned flange, enclosing a depressed annular for water; but this feature, though ornamental and useful, is not essential to my design.

The stem and pedestal may be plain or ornamented with vines and panels, without materially affecting the general aspect of the design.   

Glossary:

  • Annular; circular, ring shaped
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue