Category Archives: Trough

The Original Drinking Fountain at Saracen Cross

Location: Glasgow, Scotland

The cast iron canopy restored in 1999 at the intersection of Saracen Street and Bardowie Street known as Saracen Cross has been researched and can be viewed at this link.

An entirely different type of drinking fountain stood in the same location in 1878. This fountain was also a source of water for horses.

The 12ft 6ins. high drinking fountain was design #27 manufactured by Walter Macfarlane & Co. in the Saracen Foundry, Glasgow. The design was advertised as well suited for Street Crossings, Squares, Market Places, etc., as it afforded drinking accommodation for a large number of horses and drivers, and effectively lit a wide space, with the least possible obstruction to other traffic.

It provided a drinking trough for horses with small basins for dogs at ground level. The trough was a 6’6” diameter circular cast iron basin supported on legs in the form of horses’ hooves. The water was regulated by a small patent cistern, which was self-acting, and when the troughs were full the ball rose and shut the water off.

The central stanchion supported a central column with flared bases and pilasters. Four projecting consoles suspended cups on chains that allowed humans to drink from spouting water (the water flow was operated with two bib valves which released water when pressed). Horses drank from the large basin. A dedication shield located directly above the consoles was adhered to the fluted shaft. The decorative capital, enriched with acanthus and rosette with a dog tooth frieze, supported four lanterns. The terminal was a four sided clock.

SCO_Glasgow Saracen Cross_archivebebo_7SCO_Glasgow Saracen Cross_archivebebo_13

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Dog tooth, pyramid shaped carving
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, Flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Stanchion, an upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 

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Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee Fountain

Location: Auchencairn, Dumfries & Galloway, Scotland

A drinking fountain, lamp & trough located in the Square has been a fixture since the late 19th century. It was funded with public subscriptions and erected in commemoration of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The fountain which was only one of a few water sources in the very early 1900s also offered water to horses.

The project to restore the fountain was undertaken in 2009 by Roy Wilson who was an active member of the Auchencairn Initiative (a community fundraising organization). The structure was cleaned, repaired and repainted by Ray Innes of Innes Design Centre, a local British Industrial Design Engineer.

The structure was manufactured by Coalbrookdale Company of Shropshire, England and was originally seated on an octagonal stone plinth. A thick circular pedestal supported a large round trough from which overflow water fed a shallow trough at ground level for the use of smaller animals. During the late 20th century (post 1996) the plinth was extended using cobblestones creating a circular shape, and the short pedestal and shallow drain forming a trough for dogs was removed.

Beneath the capital of a short column rising from the centre of the trough are two decorative consoles from which drinking cups were originally suspended on chains. The decorative fluted lamp pillar with yoke maintenance arms was surmounted with a gas globe (Bray’s Flat Flame Lantern System.)

The manufacturer’s name is located on the trough basin, and on the fluted pedestal is a decorative shield inscribed with a dedication; Jubilee Lamp / Erected By / Public / Subscription / 1897.

Glossary:

  • Bray’s Flat Flame Lantern System, a cluster of wide flat burners within a glass lantern in which the upper portion was white opaque glass to reflect the light downward
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of a street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder

Columbus Man and Beast Fountain

Location: Columbus, Georgia, USA

In 1890, a contract between the Water Works Company and the city included provision of an ornamental fountain to be placed in front of the courthouse (this fountain is now located at Fourth Street and Broadway.) Three other Victorian fountains situated along Broadway clarify the adopted name of Fountain City.

Design #14 by J. L. Mott Iron Works of New York has a circular base with a trough for dogs at street level and a short bulbous pedestal decorated with flora. The cornice, decorated with acanthus frieze, sits beneath the capital which supports a finial resembling an urn surmounted with globe. A lion mascaron spouts water into a fluted basin designed for human use. A large trough for horses is located on the opposite side.

A historic marker furnished with details is located on site; Fit For Man And Beast / This watering fountain at Broadway and 10th / Street represents the last one of several located / in each block down Broadway. It is Columbus’ / oldest public fountain, dating back to the earliest / days of the city. Called the Man and Beast / fountain. It contains three watering bowls, one / at street level for dogs, a large one in the middle / for horses, and a medium-sized one near the top / for people. Although we no longer go to public / fountains to collect drinking water, fountains / offer our community an identity and sense of / history in our public spaces. / Erected By / Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc. / Historic Chattahoochee Commission / 2008

hmdb marker

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal

Pedestal


Brattleboro Drinking Fountain/Horse Trough

Location: Brattleboro, Vermont, USA

A cast iron drinking fountain for the use of man and beast was erected on the corner of Main Street and High Street in July 1872. It was located near the old oak tree in the hope that the water source would discourage the consumption of beer and alcohol. In 1875 complaints that there was little water flow may have been the reason that its usage declined.

Photographic evidence reveals that the fountain was still in place in 1907. The date when it was replaced with a fire hydrant is unknown as is the fate of the fountain.

The manufacturer of the cast iron octagonal pedestal fountain which offered a supply of drinking water to humans, horses and smaller animals is unknown. Inset arched panels and rosettes decorated the pedestal. A fluted, recessed, demi-lune basin with a cup suspended on a chain offered a drinking receptacle for humans. On the opposite side a fluted trough was offered for the refreshment of horses. Water flowed from lion mascarons into the horse trough and the small fluted demi-lune basin situated at ground level for the convenience of dogs.

same model

This fountain in San Francisco is the same model but manufacturer is unknown

Glossary:

  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design

 


Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee Horse Trough and Lamp Standard

Location: Longford, Tasmania

To celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee, a lamp was erected on 23 June 1887 in front of Mr. Whitfield’s dispensary on the corner of Wellington and Marlborough Streets in Longford. Mr. Whitfield subsequently donated ornamental fixtures for the electric light in 1911.

Longford2

In 1896, Mr. J. Smale secured public subscriptions to erect a fountain at the site of the Jubilee lamp to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The structure was manufactured by Bogle & Clark Engineers for Longford Water Trust. The circular cast iron basin was 2 ft. 6 in high and 4ft 6 in in diameter with a depth of 10ins. It was supported by a central fluted column and four legs in the form of horses’ hooves. The column rising from the basin supported the lamp. Yoke maintenance arms were positioned beneath the lantern.

The structure having been built to accommodate cattle was no match for the arrival of the motor car. In May 1924, a resident backed his car into it with such force that the fountain was dislodged and the lamp-post broken. Five years later in 1929 the drinking fountain was again repaired after being badly damaged in a collision only to suffer the same fate in 1939 when another motor vehicle collided with it in the early hours of the morning. It was moved 10 feet by the impact and badly damaged. At that time, it was decided to disconnect the water supply to prevent cows from gathering to drink as a separate water source was available for cattle a short distance away.

The trough was restored in 1988 by Glasgow Engineering (previously known as Bogle & Clark) as part of Australia’s bicentennial celebrations. It is located in the area known as Heritage Corner.

Glossary

  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Yoke maintenance arms, the bars near the top of the street light which supported the lamplighter’s ladder

 


Quebec City Fountains

Location: Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

Quebec City, with the air of an old European city, is a UNESCO world heritage site. A favourite tourist attraction is the guided horse-drawn carriage ride through the Historic District of Old Quebec. There are several drinking fountain/horse troughs throughout the city to accommodate these working beasts that can drink 49 litres of water per day.

These structures were manufactured by Henry F. Jenks of Pawtucket, R.I. and stand on an octagonal plinth. A fluted circular moulding creates a trough at ground level for the use of dogs. The fluted pedestal with attic base rising from the center of the trough hosts two arched panels for dedication; the coat of arms of Quebec City is represented by a ship in full sail which signifies Quebec’s importance as a seaport, and the full sails symbolize strength and courage.

The capital which supports a large basin 56 inches in diameter capable of holding 100 gallons, is decorated with bas-relief fret. It is 4 feet 3 inches above ground level. A central jamb hosts bas-relief including 4 dolphins that spout water into the basin with the overflow falling to the trough below. The pipes within the fountain were constructed to resist freezing in cold temperatures. The finial is highly decorated with floriated relief and a studded band terminating in a globe with the same detail as the basin.

Glossary:

  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

Metuchen Fountain and Horse Trough

Location: Metuchen, NJ, USA

In the early years of the 20th century a triangle of land at the Intersection of Oak and Middlesex Avenues was donated by Metuchen Building and Loan to house a public drinking fountain/horse trough. Following fundraising efforts, which included ball games and minstrel shows, the fountain was purchased by the Woodwild Park Association, and was erected in 1903 at the edge of the road where it was accessible to horses.

With the advent of the motor vehicle it became a traffic obstacle and was moved back from the edge of the road where it currently remains. The structure is maintained by members of the Woodwild Park Association and was restored in the 1980s. In 2016, an evaluation of the structure revealed substantial corrosion resulting in the removal of the fountain to Alexander City, Alabama where it will be restored by the restoration company, Robinson Iron.

gmnews_removal

Casting number 50 manufactured by J.L. Mott Iron Works consists of a square base with four inset panels supporting a central column with additional panels. A fluted demi-lune trough for watering horses is located on one side, and there was originally a smaller basin at ground level for dogs. On the opposite side a basin supported by console was available for people. The cornice beneath the capital is decorated with a frieze of acanthus. A large capped urn is seated on a three tiered acroter.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings