Monthly Archives: January 2016

Marine Hill Fountain

Location: Clevedon, Somerset, England

Located next to a parking bay on Marine Hill is a memorial drinking fountain and trough. It was erected in1902 as a memorial to Edward Long-Davies by his sister.

Drinking fountain number 15 from Walter Macfarlane’s & Co.’s Saracen Foundry is a wall mounted drinking fountain with a fluted demi-lune basin. An arch faceplate bears the inscription “Keep The Pavement Dry”. The interior of the arch contains a shell lunette from which a tap protrudes. Two doves represent the symbolism of the spirit drinking from the water of life. A single drinking cup on a chain is suspended on a decorative console.

The fountain was restored by the Clevedon Civic Society in 1990.

In one of the images a plaque is visible above the drinking fountain. If a reader knows the inscription, please inform me using the Comment option.

Glossary:

  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting

 

Advertisements

Mount Street Gardens Fountain

Location: Mayfair, London, England

Within Mount Street Gardens is a drinking fountain comprised of a granite reservoir and bronze pedestal. It was designed by architects Harold Peto and Sir Ernest George in 1891 for real estate agent Henry Lofts.

The multi tiered pedestal contains two demi-lune basins with lion mascarons which spout water. The pedestal is carved and molded in three forms with scroll consoles on each of the four sides. It is likely that metal cups were suspended on chains from these consoles. The capital supports the statue of a horse rearing above a wave which has been mistakenly referenced as a hippocamp (a mythological sea creature with the head and forelegs of a horse and the tail of a fish.) The tail is actually a regular horse tail. However, the front hooves of the statue are in the form of fins.

A plaque on the north side of the basin states: This Fountain Was Erected By Henry Lofts In Recognition Of Many Happy Years In Mount Street. Sir Ernest George, R.A. Fecit. 1892.

Another plaque located on the ground to the north identifies a restoration which took place in 1993. This fountain has been refurbished in honour of Carlos Castello Branco (1920 – 1993) and his wife Elvia by their daughter Luciana, unveiled by Rubens Antonio Barbosa, Brazilian Ambassador and the Lord Mayor of Westminster, Councillor Angela Hooper, OBE. 4th July 1994.

In 2005 the residents of Mayfair and St. James raised the funds required to restore the fountain which had suffered vandalism and theft of key components.

Rupert Harris Conservation Ltd. was hired to conserve and restore the fountain to working order. The modelling and molding for the statue was created from original photographs by Irene Gunston. Step by step creation can be viewed here http://www.irenegunston.com/projects.html

A second plaque on the south side of the granite basin states: The Restoration Of This Fountain Was Funded By The Residents’ Society Of Mayfair And St. James’s, Their Supporters And The Heritage Of London Trust. Unveiled By His Grace, The Duke Of Westminster, KG OBE TD DL.

rsmsj

The Grade II Listed drinking fountain was unveiled by the Duke of Westminster in 2006.

Glossary:

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue

 


W. C. T. U. Fountain

Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada

The white and gold drinking fountain, seated on a square plinth at the edge of the sidewalk alongside the Bank of Commerce on High Street West, was erected by the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U.) in 1907. Ten feet tall it consisted of a square column surmounted by a statue. Four square panels at the base contained bas-relief of two intertwined sea serpents. One of the panels offered a fluted demi-lune basin with a dog head mascaron that spouted water, for the use of dogs and small animals.

A second level of rectangular panels outlined with ‘egg and tongue’ moulding rose above a chamfered edge decorated with rosette fret. On two panels the bas-relief was sculptured with two swans with raised wings resting on an orb from which rose Neptune’s trident flanked by stylized flowers and bulrushes. The remaining two sides contained a horse trough with a large lion mascaron from which water spouted; and a drinking basin for humans, displaying only bulrushes, the leaves of which decorated the basin. Tin cups were suspended on chains. Above the arched recess was bas-relief of ivy leaves.

An upper and lower cornice with rosette and acanthus frieze bordered a third level of panels. The bulrush theme was repeated in horizontal bas-relief. The acroter was stamped with W.C.T.U. flanked by two ribbons. The capital supported a 36″ tall statue of a maiden feeding a bird, identified as #226 Girl Feeding Bird.  A bird perches on her right wrist as she gathers a tunic at her left hip with her left hand creating a pouch containing seeds. Her head is tilted slightly back and she holds a seed in her mouth. The sculpture is attributed to bronze founder, George Fischer.

The manufacturer’s stamp was visible on the octagonal base of the statue, J. W. Fiske / 26.28 Park Place / New York. The sculpture is attributed to George Fischer, bronze founder.

For detailed photos of how the original fountain looked, go to this link to see the same casting design. https://memorialdrinkingfountains.wordpress.com/?s=anacortes

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Acroter, flat base
  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfer, a beveled edge
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Mascaron, a decorative element in the form of a sculpted face or head of a human being or an animal
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design

 

 


University of Michigan Fountain

Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

This fountain created in bronze was designed by Albin Palasek, a Chicago artist and sculptor. The sculptured drum sitting on a circular granite base offers three bubblers that spout water into recessed basins.

The sculptured bas-relief is a procession of classically dressed figures representing Youth, Labour, Poetry and Philosophy: boys playing musical instruments, a child with a basket of flowers flanked by women carrying water jugs, a young man with a scroll in his hand, a maiden with exposed breast, a shepherd with sheep, and a youth displaying a scroll containing Roman numerals (I to X) before a philosopher who is deep in thought.

A dedication is engraved around the top of the drum: Presented To The City Of Ann Arbor And To The University By Francis M. Hamilton, A Member Of The Class Of 1869 And Mayor Of Ann Arbor, 1905-1907.

Francis Hamilton bequeathed $1,000 to the city of Ann Arbor to erect a drinking fountain. Following his death in 1914 his family donated an additional $500 to cover the cost. The fountain was installed at the central campus of the University of Michigan on the corner of North University Avenue & State Street. It was unveiled at Commencement in 1919 on behalf of the class of 1869, and dedicated at the 50th anniversary of Hamilton’s graduation.

Glossary:

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Bubbler, a fountain with a tap which ejects a stream of water

 


Astley Park Fountain

Location: Chorley, Lancashire, England

The fountain located in Astley Park south of the stable block to Astley Hall, a stately home which now functions as a museum, was recorded as a grade II historic listed building on 21 February 1984.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow. The structure is 9 feet 6 inches high and consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals unite with arches formed of decorated mouldings (only two griffins remain).

Rope moulded cartouches within each lunette host the image of a crane. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome.

Although the finial is missing, this drinking fountain was most often supplied with the finial of a crown with a pattée cross.

Under the canopy stood the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The basin which has a scalloped edge and decorative relief is supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The missing terminal was a crane.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Dowanhill Park Fountain

Location: Partick, Glasgow, Scotland

Land bound by Highburgh Road and Dowanhill Street was purchased in  1903 by the City Corporation. Although officially named Dowanhill Park it was known as the Wee Park to differentiate it from Whiteinch Park

The fountain is a customized structure containing several design elements by Walter Macfarlane’s Saracen Foundry in Glasgow. Seated on a circular stone plinth, the wide base is in the form of a St. Andrew’s cross with four lion jambs supporting four elaborately decorated quatrefoil basins for horses, four smaller demi-lune basins for humans and troughs at ground level for dogs. It is similar to font design number 18. The stanchion is decorated with bands of acanthus and alternating panels of cranes and swans.

Four consoles protrude from a circular fluted shaft (design number 45) to suspend drinking cups on chains. The lamp pillar was number 40 with lantern design number 224. The lantern was later replaced by a glass globe enclosed within a horizontal and vertical band. 

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

 


Edzell Drinking Fountain

Location: Edzell, Angus, Scotland

A drinking fountain was erected in 1898 in an open area not far from the Panmure Hotel. The fountain, a modification of drinking fountain number 28 with basin number 39, was a design by George Smith & Co. manufactured by the Sun Foundry.

The round based fountain, which supported a large basin and offered a trough for small animals at ground level, was seated on a circular plinth. A multi-tiered central column decorated with fret detail was flanked by two young boys holding upturned urns from which water poured. The figurines stood on a short pedestal that contained a button to release a flow of water from the urns. Four metal cups supported on chains hung from each of the horizontal consoles on the central column. Four entwined dolphins (symbolizing guardians of all things water related) encircled the column as it narrowed to the orb finial.

The bowl was broken and/or vandalised, and the figurines lost to history. The only remaining part of the fountain is the original terminal which contains the entwined dolphins and orb apex. It has been mounted on a concrete pedestal with two basins and bubbler spigots. It remains in its original location on the north west corner of Edzell Muir off B966. It was recently refurbished.

Glossary:

  • Bubbler, a fountain with a tap which ejects a stream of water
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal