Monthly Archives: September 2013

Berkeley Memorial Fountain

Location: Basseterre, St. Kitts

This memorial was erected in 1883 to commemorate Thomas Berkeley Hardtman Berkeley, an Estate Owner, a Politician and a Citizen of Basseterre. The clock drinking fountain is located in the Circus which is a replica of Piccadilly Circus in London, England.

Drinking fountain number 1 manufactured by the Sun Foundry in Glasgow, Scotland, consists of a modified octagonal base (forming the shape of cross) containing a basin within each of the four recesses.

The structure which has changed colour over the years (red, brown, green) is seated on a circular plinth. It consists of a single rectangular column divided into 5 levels using acroteria and cornices. The upper levels are supported by four columns with lamp finials.

Arches offer space for memorial inscriptions and originally had lunettes with a barometer and thermometer. A shield is displayed on the north side and the Sun Foundry manufacturer’s mark is stamped on the base. On the south side is a basin with tap and an inscription which reads: This drinking fountain has been erected by the country men and private friends of the late Thomas Berkeley Hardtman Berkeley, Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George and president of the Legislative Council of the Leeward Islands, in recognition of the many valuable services he rendered this his Native Island as a Planter, a Politician and a Citizen. His Sterling qualities, his love for this Island and his deep interest in the welfare of the country at large entitle him to a Memorial by which his memory will be preserved and perpetuated. Born 14th January 1824. Died 6th December, 1881.

In the upper tiers there is a crest or coat of arms, and a clock face points in each compass direction to a street leading off the Circus. A weather vane surmounts a four tiered acroteria at the apex.

The 100th birthday of the Berkley Memorial was celebrated in 1983, the same year that St. Kitts gained its Independence.

Glossary

  • Acroteria, an ornament placed on a flat base and mounted at the apex of the pediment
  • Cornice, a molding or ornamentation that projects from the top of a building
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Finial, A sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Plinth, Flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests.

 

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Coronation Fountain

Location: March, Cambridgeshire, England

This fountain was erected in 1912 by the inhabitants of March to commemorate the coronation of his Majesty King George V on 22nd June 1911. It is located in Broad Street, and was originally flanked by horse and dog troughs.

Deemed a traffic hazard, the font was removed in the early 1970s and sold at auction. It is currently in a private garden at Wimblington. The drinking cups have been removed and plants now hang from the supports.

On 22 February 1985, it was listed a grade II English Heritage building, and in 2002 it was refurbished by Heritage Engineering.

The canopied drinking fountain is design number 20, an elaborate 18 feet by 4 feet fountain, sold by Walter Macfarlane & Co, and manufactured at the Saracen Foundry, Possilpark, Glasgow, Scotland. Seated on a triple tiered octagonal plinth, the open filigree canopy is supported by eight columns with griffin terminals which are positioned over capitals with foliage frieze above square bases.

The highly decorated cusped arches are trimmed with rope mouldings. Cartouches contained within each lunette offer shields for memorial: swan, crane, images that depict the Fens, town crest, and a dedication shield: This fountain was erected by the inhabitants of March to commemorate the coronation of His Majesty George V 22nd June  1911. On each side arch faceplates provided a flat surface for an inscription using raised metal letters; often the useful monition, Keep the pavement dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains.

Doves and flowers offer decorative relief on the circular, ribbed dome. The internal capitals contain flowers and statues of owls on enlarged column heads. The structure is surmounted with a lantern finial.

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 18.) A circular shaft, ornamented with water lilies, rests on a wide base with canted corners. Four lion jambs support four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. Rising from the centre is a pyramid shaped stanchion decorated with swan and bird decoration. A kylix-shaped lamp terminal with four consoles offer drinking cups suspended by chains.

Glossary

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cusped Arch, the point of intersection of lobed or scalloped form
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Kylix, a Grecian style drinking cup
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

Burgersdorp Jubilee Fountain

Location: Burgersdorp, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Located in Burgher Square, the fountain was erected by the citizens of the town on the occasion of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The structure was declared a national monument in 1988.

The canopied drinking fountain is design number 21 (18 feet by 4 feet) from Walter Macfarlane’s catalog manufactured at the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, Scotland. Seated on a two tiered octagonal plinth, the canopy is supported by eight columns with griffin terminals which are positioned over capitals with foliage frieze above square bases.

The highly decorated cusped arches are trimmed with rope mouldings. Cartouches contained within each lunette offer shields for memorial. Cranes and a dedication shield are evident: Erected by the inhabitants of Burgersdorp and District in commemoration of Her Majesty Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee 1897. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep the pavement dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains.

Doves and flowers offer decorative relief on the circular, open filigree, ribbed dome. The internal capitals contain flowers. The original terminal of a crown with a pattée cross is missing.

Under the canopy stands font casting number 7. The 5 ft 8ins high font is a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and descending salamander relief supporting a basin 2 ft 6 ins in diameter. The interior surface of the scalloped edge basin is engraved with decorative relief, and a sculptured vase is terminated by the figure of a crane. Four elaborate consoles support drinking cups on chains.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions; salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire; lions are symbolic of guardianship; and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

King’s Park Fountain

This cast iron drinking fountain located in the East corner of King’s Park, Stirling, was manufactured by the Lion Foundry in Kirkintilloch, Scotland using a design from George Smith & Co. Catalogue.

This cast iron drinking fountain was manufactured by the Lion Foundry in Kirkintilloch, Scotland using a design from George Smith & Co. Catalogue. Casting number 41 is a rectangular structure with a square base resting on a two tier plinth. Projecting demi-lune basins flanked by foliated bas-relief are located on four sides. The central pedestal has chamfered corners with additional bas-relief. A palmette frieze sits beneath the capital. The fountain terminates with an urn finial, casting number 339.

It was erected in 1939 to provide fresh drinking water to the public. Restoration in 2006 was funded by Sterling City Heritage Trust and friends of King’s Park in 2006.

It was listed as a category B historic building in 2006, and is the only known example of this unique design, produced by the Lion Foundry in Kirkintilloch.

Glossary

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Chamfer, a beveled edge
  • Demilune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical entablature just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Palmette, a decorative motif resembling the fan shaped leaves of a palm tree
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests

 

 


Robert & Lucy Thomas Memorial Fountain

Location: Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales

Located in the public square at the southern entrance to the High Street, next to St Tydfil’s Churchyard, , a drinking fountain is seated on a tiered plinth. It was inaugurated in 1906 to mark the granting of the town’s charter. By 1966 the original drinking fountain had been removed and the canopy needed restoration. It was removed as part of a road improvement scheme and relocated in 1966 to the area outside St. Tydfil’s Church. It was designated a Grade II listed building in January 1988 and restored in 1995.

The canopied drinking fountain is design number 20, an elaborate 18 feet by 4 feet fountain, sold by Walter Macfarlane & Co, and manufactured at the Saracen Foundry, Possilpark, Glasgow, Scotland. The open filigree canopy is supported by eight columns with griffin terminals which are positioned over capitals with foliage frieze above square bases.

The highly decorated cusped arches are trimmed with rope mouldings. Cartouches contained within each lunette offer shields for memorial: a miner wielding a pick axe; a working miner; the coat of arms of St. Tydfil; and a dedication shield Erected by Sir William T. Lewis and William Thomas Rees of Aberdare and presented to their native town in commemoration of Robert and Lucy Thomas of Waunwyltt in this parish, the pioneers in 1828 of the South Wales steam coal trade. The interior lunettes are lion mascarons.

Doves and flowers offer decorative relief on the circular, ribbed dome. The internal capitals contain flowers, and lion mascarons area placed on internal lunettes. The cast iron structure is surmounted by a heroic classical figure of Samson inscribed Strength.

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 18.) A circular shaft, ornamented with water lilies, rests on a wide base with canted corners. Four lion jambs support four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. Rising from the centre is a pyramid shaped stanchion decorated with swan and bird decoration. A kylix-shaped lamp terminal with four consoles offer drinking cups suspended by chains.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions; and lions are symbolic of guardianship

Glossary:

  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cusped Arch, the point of intersection of lobed or scalloped forms
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Frieze, the horizontal part of a classical moulding just below the cornice, often decorated with carvings
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Kylix, a Grecian style drinking cup
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Mascaron
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Wilkinson Memorial Drinking Fountain

Location: Williamstown, Victoria, Australia

Reverend George Wilkinson. a native of County Cork, and described as a perfectionist, was the first rector of the prefabricated iron Holy Trinity Church, Williamstown. The temperance movement was a powerful religious, political and social force in Victorian society and he was held in awe for his denunciation of the evils of drink.

The cast-iron drinking fountain manufactured by the Saracen Company fountain is located at the corner of Nelson Place & Syme Street, Commonwealth Reserve, Williamstown, and was erected in 1876 by public subscription to commemorate the Reverend who had died a year earlier. The Wilkinson Memorial Drinking Fountain is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register Number H1733.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue stands on a bluestone plinth made by monumental mason, Harry Bliss. The structure is 9 feet 6 inches high and consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals unite with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches contained within each lunette host the image of a crane, and an inscription which reads, Wilkinson Memorial Drinking Fountain 1875. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome, the finial being a crown with a pattée cross.

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The basin which has a scalloped edge and decorative relief is supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The terminal (a crane) was removed with the original copper cups about 1935 when it was converted to a bubbler. The fountain currently has two stainless steel taps.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

McLagan Drinking Fountain

Location: Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland

The drinking fountain was presented to the town of Bathgate in 1878 by the wife of the local Member of Parliament, Peter McLagan, to provide free clean gravity fed water from the filters on Drumcross Road. Peter McLagan was a land owner, shale mine operator and an advocate of the Temperance cause which made the donation of a drinking fountain especially meaningful.

The structure originally stood on a two tiered plinth in the middle of the road at the crossroads of Hopetoun Street, North Bridge Street, Livery Street and Engine Street (later named George Street). Photographic evidence reveals that it was a gathering place when the local pub closed its doors for the night. Its position in the middle of the road interfered with traffic flow and was most likely the reason it was moved to the lower end of George Street known as the Steelyard.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow, the most prolific architectural iron founders in the world. The structure is 9 feet 6 inches high and consists of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals unite with arches formed of decorated mouldings. Griffins are symbols of guardians of priceless possessions.

Rope moulded cartouches within each lunette host the image of a crane, and a dedication shield states; Presented by Mrs. McLagan of Pumpherston in commemoration of the opening of the Bathgate Water Works, 30th May 1878; and, Rescued by Bathgate Community Council and restored by West Lothian District Council.’ On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains.

The structure is surmounted by an open filigree dome. The fountain was provided with a lantern at the behest of the purchaser. However, the lamp did not survive the move to the new location at the Steelyard and a crown with a pattée cross finial now stands in its stead.

Under the canopy stands the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The basin which has a scalloped edge and decorative relief is supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offer drinking cups suspended by chains. The terminal is a crane.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal