Category Archives: England

Arthur Itter Memorial Fountain

Location: Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

Itter Memorial Park and the drinking fountain located just inside the park were donated to commemorate the life of businessman and philanthropist Arthur Itter, M.A. B.COM. During his lifetime he was a brick manufacturer, a member of the Council of the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland, and Mayor of the City of Peterborough.

penmorfa

In 1933 at age 35 years, he became Mayor Elect of the City of Peterborough. He holds two records; the youngest Mayor ever to be elected; and the shortest term of a Peterborough Mayor. He died following a sudden illness on 26th December 1934 after only being in office for two months.

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain seated on a two tiered circular plinth is design #14 manufactured by George Smith & Co., Sun Foundry, Glasgow. The ogee shaped base and acroter support a single pillar with attic base and inset arched panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola. The structure is surmounted with an orb finial.

Originally, cups suspended on chains above the two demi-lune basins offered water to humans, and a trough at ground level supplied smaller animals. A dedication marker is inscribed with the following legend:

This Drinking Fountain Was Erected By / The Mayor, Aldermen And Citizens Of / The City Of Peterborough As A Memorial / To Arthur Itter M.A. B.Com Who Was A Member / Of The City Council From the 26th March / 1929 to the 26th of December 1935. And Died / During His Year Of Office As Mayor Of The / City On The 26th December 1935.

Note that the dates on the plaque are incorrect. Arthur Itter died in 1934. The park was donated by his family in 1935.

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave
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Fawcett Street Station Drinking Fountain

Location: Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England

Inset to a wall opposite the war museum on Burdon Road is a drinking fountain accompanied by Blue plaque № 1362 which bears the legend;City Of Sunderland / Fawcett Street / Station (1853-1879) / This Drinking Fountain / Marks The Entrance To The / Former Terminus Of The / Penshaw Branch Line. / The Station Closed To / Passengers When The / Central Station Opened. / York, Newcastle And Berwick Railway Co.

disusedstations_NickCatford

Used with permission, Nick Catford Source: http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/s/sunderland_fawcett_street/

Although the old Penshaw branch line terminated at Burdon Road, the terminus was named Fawcett Street Station to distinguish it from the Monkwearmouth and Hendon stations.

disusedstations_Nick Catford

Used with permission, Nick Catford Source: http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/s/sunderland_fawcett_street

The manufacturer of this drinking fountain is unknown. A recessed round arch structure hosts a demi-lune basin. Water, dispersed into the basin via a spigot situated in the interior of the arch, was gathered into a metal cup suspended on a chain.

The arch faceplate hosts a medallion bearing the coat of arms of Sunderland and the city motto, “Nil Desperandum, Auspice Deo” translated as When God is on our side there is no cause for despair.

The fountain is decorated with two rosettes situated at the bottom corners and a foliate finial at the apex.

flickr_worrall

Used with permission, Tony Worrall. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyworrall/14775320557

Glossary

  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Foliate, decorated with leaves or leaf like motif
  • Medallion, a circular device bearing a portrait or relief moulding
  • Rosette, a round stylized flower design
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid

 


Ashton Park Fountain

Location: Preston, Lancashire, England

This octagonal shaped drinking fountain seated on an octagonal plinth is design #14 manufactured by George Smith & Co., Sun Foundry, Glasgow. The ogee shaped base and acroter support a single pillar with attic base and inset arched panels. Entablature with bolt consoles sit beneath an ogee cupola. The structure is surmounted with an acorn shaped finial.

Two demi-lune basins originally offered a cup suspended on a chain for the use of humans, and at ground level, was a basin for dogs.

ashton park preston

Used with permission, Tony Worrall. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyworrall/875406715

The plaque on the base is engraved with the legend; Fredk Bird & Co. / Engineers & / Ironfounders / London W.

Glossary

  • Acroter, flat base
  • Attic base, a column base with two rings
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Cupola, a small, domed structure on top of a roof.
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Entablature, moldings and bands which lie horizontally above columns
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Ogee, curve with a concave

St. Leonard’s Square Fountain

Location: Wallingford, Oxfordshire, England

A cast iron drinking fountain replaced an ornamental pump which had been installed for use in the market place in 1835. The fountain presented to the town by Alderman Hawkins was of similar design to the fountain donated by Alderman Champion and erected in St Leonard’s Square in 1885. It no longer exists.

1908

Circa 1908 St. Leonard’s Square

The fountain in St. Leonard’s Square was design #31 from the catalogue of Walter Macfarlane’s Saracen Foundry in Glasgow. Seated on a circular stone plinth, the wide base was in the form of a St. Andrew’s cross with four lion jambs supporting four elaborately decorated quatrefoil basins for horses. The stanchion was decorated with bands of acanthus and alternating panels of cranes and swans.

Four consoles protruded from a circular fluted shaft to suspend drinking cups on chains. The standard design was offered with a round lamp.

Glossary:

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Fluted Shaft, a long rounded groove decorating the shaft of a column
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Plinth, Flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, upright bar or post providing support

 


Saavedra Fountain

Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

This wall drinking fountain is model D17 cast by the Kennedy Patent Water Meter Co. Ltd. of Kilmarnock, Scotland, now known as Glenfield & Kennedy Ltd. It is inset to the wall of the Luis Maria Saavedra railway station in the Northern end of Buenos Aires. It was installed in 1891 when the station opened.

Buenos_flickr_marzilius

The cast iron backplate has straight sides with arches at the top and bottom of the structure. A central push button released water from a shell motif spigot into a fluted demi-lune basin. A galvanized cup, originally suspended by a chain, captured drinking water from patented self-closing taps.

The fountain hosts several bas-relief inscriptions;

  • Keep The Pavement Dry (civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains);
  • FCCA; an acronym for Ferrocarril Central Argentino translated as Central Argentina Railway.
  • Kennedy Patentee;
  • Kilmarnock.

This model is also located on the Alton Railway Station Platform in Hampshire, England.

Alton_flickr_rusty marvin

Used with permission. Photographer: http://johnworacker.com

Alton_flickr_paul busby

Used with permission, Paul Busby. Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/busb/3353597652/

Glossary

  • Bas-relief, sculpted material that has been raised from the background to create a slight projection from the surface
  • Demi-lune, half moon or crescent shape
  • Fluted, a long rounded groove
  • Spigot, a device that controls the flow of liquid

 


Castleford Diamond Jubilee Fountain

Location: Castleford, Yorkshire, England

Queen’s Park was created in 1897 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. The fountain was installed in 1898. The bandstand which was built in 1900 remains; however, vandalism precipitated the removal of the drinking fountain in the 1950s.

Drinking fountain number 8 from Walter Macfarlane & Co.’s catalogue was manufactured at the Saracen Foundry at Possilpark in Glasgow. The structure was 9 feet 6 inches high and consisted of four columns, from the capitals of which consoles with griffin terminals united with arches formed of decorated mouldings.

Rope moulded cartouches within each lunette hosted the image of a crane, and an open bible displaying a verse from St. John’s Gospel chapter 4 verse 14, ‘Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again but whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst,’ or optional memorial shields. On two of the sides provision was made for receiving an inscription using raised metal letters; whilst on the other two sides was the useful monition, Keep The Pavement Dry. Civic virtues such as temperance were often extolled in inscriptions on drinking fountains. The structure was surmounted by an open filigree dome, the finial being a crown with a pattée cross.

Under the canopy stood the font (design number 7) 5 foot 8 inches high. The terminal was a crane. The basin (2 feet 6 inches in diameter) which had a scalloped edge and decorative relief was supported by a single decorative pedestal with four pilasters and four descending salamanders, a symbol of courage and bravery. A central urn with four consoles offered drinking cups suspended by chains. The fountain was operated by pressing a button.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Griffins are symbolic of guardians of priceless possessions, salamanders display bravery and courage that cannot be extinguished by fire, and cranes are recognized as a symbol of vigilance.

Glossary

  • Capital: The top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Cartouche, a structure or figure, often in the shape of an oval shield or oblong scroll, used as an architectural or graphic ornament or to bear a design or inscription
  • Console: a decorative bracket support element
  • Filigree, fine ornamental work
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Fret, running or repeated ornament
  • Griffin, winged lion denotes vigilance and strength, guards treasure and priceless possessions
  • Lunette, the half-moon shaped space framed by an arch, often containing a window or painting
  • Pattée cross, a cross with arms that narrow at the centre and flare out at the perimeter
  • Pedestal, an architectural support for a column or statue
  • Pilaster, a column form that is only ornamental and not supporting a structure
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Terminal, statue or ornament that stands on a pedestal

 


Church Street Fountain

Location: Preston, Lancashire, England

A cast iron drinking fountain/horse trough was erected in 1897 at the intersection of Church and Stanley Streets outside H. M. Prison. It was donated in 1897 by Mary Cross, the founder of the Deaf and Dumb School at Brockholes. Sadly, it no longer exists.

Design number 19 was advertised by Walter Macfarlane & Co. to be used as a standalone fountain or placed under a canopy structure. Manufactured by the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow, the font was 10’ 10” high. The wide base with canted corners supported a circular shaft ornamented with water lilies. Four lion jambs supported four highly decorated quatrefoil basins. The stanchion and central column were decorated with floral relief and projecting acanthus. Four consoles protruded from the column to suspend drinking cups on chains. Two elaborate brackets supported lamps. The capital supported the finial, a statue of Samson.

Symbolism was popular in Victorian times. Lions are symbolic of guardianship and Samson is symbolic of strength.

1900

Circa 1900

barrackschurch st

Glossary

  • Acanthus, one of the most common plant forms (deeply cut leaves) to make foliage ornament and decoration
  • Capital, the top of a column that supports the load bearing down on it
  • Canted corner, an angled surface which cuts of a corner
  • Console, a decorative bracket support element
  • Finial, a sculptured ornament fixed to the top of a peak, arch, gable or similar structure
  • Jamb, a projecting vertical post containing sculpture
  • Plinth, flat base usually projecting, upon which a pedestal, wall or column rests
  • Quatrefoil, a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially-overlapping circles of the same diameter
  • Stanchion, an upright bar or post providing support